Analyst: open source officially crosses the chasm into mainstream adoption

Analyst: open source officially crosses the chasm into mainstream adoption

Summary: Open source has officially "crossed the chasm from early adoption to mainstream adoption," one top analyst announced at LinuxCon.Jeffrey Hammond, principal analyst at Forreseter Research, said he bases his broad conclusion on several surveys peformed in 2010 which indicate that almost 70 percent of corporate customers say they are using Linux at the operating system layer, 65 percent are using open source at the database tier and about 60 percent are now using GPL-based programming languages.

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TOPICS: Open Source
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Open source has officially "crossed the chasm from early adoption to mainstream adoption," one top analyst announced at LinuxCon.

Jeffrey Hammond, principal analyst at Forreseter Research, said he bases his broad conclusion on several surveys peformed in 2010 which indicate that almost 70 percent of corporate customers say they are using Linux at the operating system layer, 65 percent are using open source at the database tier and about 60 percent are now using GPL-based programming languages.

"We've moved from a 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' policy into strategic adoption," Hammond said during his keynote at LinuxCon Wednesday. "Take your victory lap and we'll move on."

Ironically, another key indicator of open source's acceptance is that it slipped on the list of top strategic priorities of IT architects and CIOs.

"We saw it was not quite as important in 2010 as in [our] 2009 survey. It's not top of list but there's good reason for that: it's already happened. We're there. We asked developers and asked different [users] using open source and its all over the place," he said, noting, however, that open source still tops the survey in terms of technology deployment for this year.

In one of the surveys aimed at a group composed of quite a few .NET developers, only one in five said they are not using any open source and roughly 20 percent say they are contibuting to at least one open source project, Hammond said.

IT pros remain interested in using open source to reduce costs and integrate disparate technologies, as was indicated in last year's survey, but two other priorities popped up in the same survey in 2010: "improving the speed of business processes and getting in position to support growth when we come out of the recession,"Hammond said.

Linux advocates should highlight the secondary benefits of open source to address these next gen requirements, namely enhanced speed and flexibility and increased developer engagement, which occurs when customers feel less like curators of proprietary software and more like owners of their  infrastructure from "stem to stern," Hammond said.

Topic: Open Source

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  • 2010 is the year of Linux!

    Again.
    frgough
    • Maybe

      @frgough With Chrome and Android and virtualization, maybe you're right.
      DanaBlankenhorn
    • Considering servers, Android, other embedded devices, it has been quite the

      year. Linux based phones did quite a bite better than Microsoft operating systems on phones this year.
      DonnieBoy
      • True,on one item but then again,

        Microsoft announced a new version of Phone OS on the horizon, so logic would indicate that many are waiting before purchasing a Windows phone.<br><br>Severs? All data points to Microsoft still outselling linux in the server market, so one would have to wonder where you derived your information from.<br><br>Embedded devices? The numbers there are also not promising: There are far, far many devices that do not use Linux then those that do. Just having the usage double from 10 to 20 devices does not indicate that it is taking the world by storm. Not when 200,000 devices do not run use it.<br><br><img border="0" src="http://www.cnet.com/i/mb/emoticons/plain.gif" alt="plain">
        Tim Cook
      • RE: Analyst: open source officially crosses the chasm into mainstream adoption

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        musdahi
    • In the spirit of "summer of recovery"

      @frgough

      I guess this top "analyst" was reading off Obama's prompter.
      LBiege
      • A change?

        @LBiege
        Do you think MS salesmen have finally been given their marching orders?
        peter_erskine
  • It's interesting how many people hear "open source"...

    and the only thing that comes to mind is Linux. FireFox is far and away the most used piece of open source software in the world. For software developers, NUnit and JUnit have become ubiquitous. Apache has been a major player in the web server world for over a decade now. Open source has been in the mainstream for quite some time now.
    jasonp9
    • Very true, and, the author was talking open source, NOT Linux in particular

      NT.
      DonnieBoy
      • Agreed...

        I just find it amusing that so-called pundits see open source as just now moving into the mainstream. I also find it amusing that discussion of open source seems to always generate knee-jerk reactions, both positive and negative, based solely on Linux...ie "2010 is the year of Linux!".
        jasonp9
      • And a great many of those open source programs

        are Windows based.

        :|
        Tim Cook
    • RE: Analyst: open source officially crosses the chasm into mainstream adoption

      @jasonp@...

      It's also worth realising that the vast majority of open source is Windows based. Just the amount of open source VB code that is available, dwarfs anything Linux will ever have.
      tonymcs1
      • No problem with that.

        @tonymcs@...
        Open source means software by the people, for the people. OUR software. Program whatever platform you find easiest.
        peter_erskine
      • RE: Analyst: open source officially crosses the chasm into mainstream adoption

        It's also worth realising that the vast majority of open source is Windows based????????
        Windows is 2nd class citizen in Open Source Land, going down to 3rd class.
        Even Mac OS X is a more popular, open & supported platform. Just try to install Apache on Linux, Mac OSX & Win7. Now see where you have more documentation & support. Try the same with Plone, or Joomla. Try to see where Python is better supported. Do you see a trend? Working all day with OSS, I see it.
        theo_durcan
  • Does that mean they'll reach 2% desktop share in 10 years?

    "Open source has officially 'crossed the chasm from early adoption to mainstream adoption,' one top analyst announced at LinuxCon."

    EXCELLENT! Does that mean they'll reach 2% desktop share in 10 years?
    CobraA1
    • Again, he is talking open source in general, not Linux Desktop. On smart

      phones, Linux has a lot more than 2%, same on servers. Open source for web servers, well over 50%.
      DonnieBoy
      • Can you link to that percentage?

        It would appear that your math is faulty

        :|
        Tim Cook
      • RE: Analyst: open source officially crosses the chasm into mainstream adoption

        @DonnieBoy <br><br>Servers 20.4% (per sales, doesn't count the vast majority which are free deployments):<br><a href="http://www.idc.com/getdoc.jsp?containerId=prUS22360110" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://www.idc.com/getdoc.jsp?containerId=prUS22360110</a><br><br>Android 17%:<br><a href="http://www.asymco.com/2010/08/02/android-global-share-rises-to-16-of-smartphones-in-q1/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://www.asymco.com/2010/08/02/android-global-share-rises-to-16-of-smartphones-in-q1/</a>

        Mister Spock's brain seems to be faulty.
        Slated
  • GPL-based programming language?

    Not to rain on the parade (I am a staunch Free Software supporter) but ... what exactly is a "GPL-based programming language"?

    Never heard of such a thing.

    There are GPL-licensed compilers and IDEs (i.e. the toolchain in general), but AFAIK it isn't even possible to license a programming language per se, under the GPL or otherwise.

    What an odd thing to say.

    I take it this was a quote from some clueless marketing monkey, rather than someone who knows what the GPL actually is ... or what programming languages are, for that matter.
    Slated
    • GPL spoken here.

      @Slated
      java might be GPL'ed, but it used to have a different open source license. Even though it's the first one I wrote here, I don't think it'd come to mind.

      bash is gpl.

      I think clisp is gpl'ed, but that was because of gettext and I think I saw that the writers licensed it that way begrudgingly.

      Any GNU languages, such as guile, are, I'd guess.

      python is GPL compatible, but not GPL. perl is Artistic.

      OCaml is definitely not, which is why I believe Microsoft used it as the basis for F#.

      I think you're right, someone's just using words: maybe they're paid by the acronym!

      Enough idle and fun speculation. Let's see if there's a link where I may find out.
      DannyO_0x98