Red Hat, Novell win verdict in Linux patent infringement case

Red Hat, Novell win verdict in Linux patent infringement case

Summary: More great news for Linux distributors Red Hat and Novell, which prevailed in a patent infringement case brought by IP Innovation.IP Innovation, a unit of Acacia Research and holder of multiple patent portfolios, alleged that the two Linux companies infringed three patents that protect computer GUIs that span multiple work sites and that allow users to access icons remotely, the court documents show.

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More great news for Linux distributors Red Hat and Novell, which prevailed in a patent infringement case brought by IP Innovation.

IP Innovation, a unit of Acacia Research and holder of multiple patent portfolios, alleged that the two Linux companies infringed three patents that protect computer GUIs that span multiple work sites and that allow users to access icons remotely, the court documents show.

According to a report published by Bloomberg news, a jury in Marshall, Texas found that the patents in question were not valid and that neither Red Hat nor Novell were guilty of infringing on IP Innovation's intellectual property.

In a press release, Red Hat said it will "remain stalwart in resisting bogus shakedown tactics."

Novell recently celebrated the end of a copyright infringement lawsuit brought against it by SCO several years ago.

Now that the SCO and IP Innovation cases are disposed of, it anyone else want to take on Linux?

Topics: Legal, Linux, Open Source, Operating Systems, Software

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23 comments
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  • Judging by the recent MS/HTC ?agreement?

    MS continues to take on Linux, albiet passively. Still; by avoiding
    litigation, I have to concede such agreements may infact help the uptake
    of Linux-based systems and for that I?m thankful... and yes; down with
    flimsy software patent infringement claims against both Linux or
    proprietary software.
    rikasa
    • Amen! Software patents are scraping the bottom of the barrel

      and the barrel already has holes in its bottom.
      Ole Man
      • RE: Red Hat, Novell win verdict in Linux patent infringement case

        in resisting bogus shakedown<a href="http://no634.org/"><font color="light&amp;height"> about it</font></a> is bank that <a href="http://beerandnews.com/"><font color="light&amp;height">website</font></a> attacked from the <a href="http://www.billingshousingmarket.com/"><font color="light&amp;height">site support</font></a> from any soldier <a href="http://charlottefrontandcenter.com/"><font color="light&amp;height">site</font></a> to the light <a href="http://communitiesforbroadband.com/"><font color="light&amp;height">home page</font></a> is great tactics
        gorians
    • One big reason...

      MS avoids an all out patent war is IBM. It holds quite a few patents that MS licenses and cannot survive without them. Piss off IBM and they would tear MS a new one.
      Dave32265
      • Sooo. Give us some examples. Or are you blowing smoke!

        nt
        andrej770
      • One big reason...amongst how many?

        Oh super clairvoyant one, dost thou know any other fine answers like that?
        twaynesdomain-22354355019875063839220739305988
  • The Black Knight, fat ladies, and curtain calls

    [i]Novell recently celebrated the end of a copyright infringement lawsuit brought against it by SCO several years ago.[/i]

    Not yet. SCOX has motions before the Court to set aside the jury verdict and to have the Court assign the copyrights to them anyway. Failing those, they'll appeal to the Tenth District.
    Yagotta B. Kidding
    • 100% correct!

      Yagotta, our opinions nearly always disagree- but your comment is totally on the money today. It's *NOT* over until the motions are settled, Appeals are denied (or completed, or the 10th circuit refuses to hear them). I remember a certain case, between Microsoft and a company named "Netscape". When it was handed back to the Bush?Ashcroft DOJ for a "Final Judgement remedy", many States saw the so-called remedy to be so manifestly ineffective that they ATTEMPTED to Withdraw from the combined suit. But they were not allowed to do so.

      Anyway, back to this case. (The same District Appeals Court would be involved, so that bit of history is relevant.):

      Although there's no EVIDENCE to prove that large amounts of hidden Microsoft Money, above and beyond the $10M license payment, fund the continuing existence of Caldera/SCOX, it's really difficult to explain why the company has "attracted" sufficient investment to stay alive this long. Only an IDIOT would fail to suspect the support of Microsoft's war-chest of cash, in one way or another.

      Perhaps such evidence is forthcoming, presented from a victimized Linux company as PLAINTIFF, in some future case. A lot of people say that they expect IBM to happily spend lots of cash, cash which they won't be able to recover via Court-awarded damages, in order to make a frightening example out of SCOX and it's executives (both current and former) -- sending a message to anyone else who might want to try this BS in the future. But there's no movement in this area yet, and it might never get pursued.
      Rick S._z
  • Expected results .....

    The patent trolls were trying to assert a patent on features that Linux (actually KDE, GNOME, and pretty much all other open source window managers) had years before they submitted the patent.

    It is kind of hard to give credit to somebody who patented somebody else's work years after the "innovation" was in use.
    wackoae
  • RE: Red Hat, Novell win verdict in Linux patent infringement case

    Dave32265,
    First, IBM is one of MS's biggest users of Windows;
    Second, this thread is about Red Hat, and Novell.
    Can "we" keep on subject please?
    Mr. Tinker
    • Not that far off.

      As I read it. The subject is about software patent infringement litigation, and two companies who've won.

      In the early days, M.S. was one of the largest opponents to software patents. That's because, at the time they didn't have very many. The tide has turned, and if it weren't for IBM and a few others, I bet they'd love pull out the patent trolls and $haft Linux. IBM was dumb for not buying Bill's OS outright when they had the chance, I don't think they're still that dumb... I could be wrong.

      The last statement in the article is "...anyone else want to take on Linux" Sounds to me like this opens things up a bit... No?
      flhtc
    • IBM does not use MS software

      Um, at IBM you have to have a senior vice presedents permission to use anything from Microsoft. They are using Linux only for desktop and development and they have NO Microsoft servers except for lab testing.
      IBM is no longer a major user of Microsoft software.
      Do a search, you will find it.
      sysop-dr
      • Not True

        In IBM, Windows XP is by far the dominant
        desktop OS and Windows Servers are everywhere.
        Employees who receive new notebooks are
        receiving them with the IBM standard platform
        which is XP. IBM has a huge internal Microsoft
        Technology Group and builds Microsoft
        Technology-based solutions for any customer
        that asks for one. There are even widely used
        financial applications deployed world-wide
        based on .NET. Despite the grumbling of
        management, these applications flourish. While
        it seems logical that IBM would stop deploying
        MS Office, it just ain't happening. Office is
        everywhere and Symphony is the ugly stepchild
        nobody wants.
        DXVictor
      • Not true . . .

        My IBM-issued Thinkpad came with Windows XP installed & Office viewers . . . even though it had Symphony installed. IBM is planning on rolling out bunches of M$ servers on their State of Georgia account.
        chillyd1@...
      • Not True....

        My IBM provided laptop has XP and MS Office. Not sure what you are talking about.....
        flexing
  • RE: Red Hat, Novell win verdict in Linux patent infringement case

    This would be another good example to share with your asset management teams, and consider mentioning during IT dept meetings for awareness. For my self I relay this type of information for staff training sessions since we're dealing with sware compliancy daily.
    Asset Detective
  • Windows desktops scarce at IBM

    There was a news item over three years ago about how IBM were swinging their Enterprise desktops over to Linux. Don't think there are many Windows desktops there. Don't forget IBM has based "Symphony" on Openoffice.org suite and is pushing it hard. Bit hard to do that if you are not using your own product.
    Alganon
    • Scarce? Not really

      Inside IBM you will find mostly Windows XP on
      desktops. Linux servers are very common as are
      AIX. But Windows servers are still very much
      present. IBM once thought they could rollout a
      linux desktop to the masses of IBMers, but
      intense user resistance could not be overcome.
      I'm sure there's still a few execs that think
      it might happen. Symphony is doing ok but is
      not getting much respect. There are just an
      endless stream of complaints about compatibility with MS products which is what
      most customers use. Pressure is building from
      the rank-and-file for Windows 7.
      DXVictor
  • I Remember When...

    ...software could not be patented. What happened to those days?

    -Peter Ronald Wexler
    prwexler@...
  • RE: Red Hat, Novell win verdict in Linux patent infringement case

    Excellent!
    mrgoose