The top 10 consumer open source projects

The top 10 consumer open source projects

Summary: Our Crave blog has compiled a list of the top 10 open source projects for consumers, and while their list covers 11 Web pages here's the whole thing, Letterman-style:

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Crave blog logo from C|NetOur Crave blog has compiled a list of the top 10 open source projects for consumers, and while their list covers 11 Web pages here's the whole thing, Letterman-style:

(Sorry, no jokes in honor of the writer's strike.)

I've tried several of these in the past, and depend on those I marked with a the. There are others, like Miro, which I'm surprised didn't make the cut (the editors preferred MediaPortal).

There are also some, like RSSOwl, which I've tried and discarded in favor of commercial alternatives. I prefer the way FeedDemon from Newsgator organizes unread content, for instance, and find that's a difference worth paying for.

These are Windows programs, or at least available in Windows versions, which still remains a hurdle for mass market acceptance. Comparisons in quality between the Linux and Windows versions of some winners would be cool to see.

But the question remains, how many of these have you tried? And how many have you come to depend upon?

We talk the talk here. How far have you walked the walk? [poll id=63] [poll id=64]

Topics: Social Enterprise, Browser, Collaboration, Open Source, Operating Systems, Software, Windows

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10 comments
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  • Infrarecorder needs more publicity

    I am glad to see Infrarecorder on this list. I'm sure you all realize that Windows XP doesn't come with a good CD/DVD burning tool. You can copy files, but what if I want to work with ISO images?

    I often see people purchasing Nero or Roxio to accomplish these tasks. Make sure you tell all your friends and family about Infrarecorder before they go out and waste their money on those products.

    Tristan
    tristanrhodes
    • CDs and DVDs are the new floppies

      When this technology first emerged, and it was seen these formats had the capacity to hold albums or movies, it was decided they were too dangerous (to copyright holders) to be fully supported.

      But in today's technological terms, such drives are the equivalent of floppy drives.

      Interesting how Moore's Law works...
      DanaBlankenhorn
  • RE: The top 10 consumer open source projects

    Just wanted to let you know that I've tried Pidgin and it's cool (I used GAM previously). I'm also a fan of Audacity. OpenOffice and Firefox are staples, as are Thunderbird and GIMP.

    I would also recommend the Thunar graphical file manager, mousepad for a graphical text editor, and Pine if you want a text-based e-mail client.
    mannyamador
    • ah yes, Pine...

      My best friend has used Pine for years. But he says most of the ISPs he tries to deal with won't let him use it. They insist on POP3 at a minimum.
      DanaBlankenhorn
  • RE: The top 10 consumer open source projects

    Thunderbird not on the list? It's another staple for me.
    milton@...
  • Playsitall?!

    This is so funny. A really 'serious' study that failed to notice that the product's name is VLC, and Plays It All is just a marketing slogan for it.

    Milan B
    http://www.guacosoft.com -- Multiplayer PacMan
    mbabuskov
    • Maybe there's a message here

      and the message is, change the name. What does VLC mean? Plays It All says it all.

      Think of it as open source marketing, Milan.
      DanaBlankenhorn
      • Misleading.

        If you were used VideoLAN i would have voted it. Playsitall?? I didn't recognise that.
        pablo Dante
  • RE: The top 10 consumer open source projects

    While I use both Gimp and Open Office I don't think of them as consumer products. Ifranview seems to be a consumer product, Photoshop is not.
    netman4ttm
    • Definitions are always fuzzy

      I think by consumer product they mean something that runs on a fairly standard client and is used by millions of users. I think Gimp qualifies under that definition.

      But what's your definition?
      DanaBlankenhorn