Would consolidation drive Linux forward?

Would consolidation drive Linux forward?

Summary: Would open source be better served if we had more mergers in this space, and fewer players?

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TOPICS: China
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China FlagHere's a great question to ponder this weekend.

Would consolidation be good for Linux?

The question occurs because China apparently thinks it would be. Three of the biggest players in the Linux space there are talking mega-merger

Turbolinux China, Red Flag Software, and Beijing Co-Create Open Source figure that if they get together they can become another Baidu and get rich quick. (Or their investment banker could be honored as the country's model worker, like Yao Ming.)

More important, a big merger would also provide the marketing and management heft needed to push things forward against the dominant OS in the region, which is pirated copies of Windows.

My question, of course, relates more to the U.S. Would open source be better served if we had more mergers in this space, and fewer players? Would Linux move forward faster if there were fewer distributors?

Personally, I don't think so. But I am neither a model worker nor an investment banker.

Topic: China

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  • Boycott Dell, HP and Gateway

    What will move Linux forward
    is when the major computer suppliers
    start marketing Linux to consumers.
    instead of continuing to maintain
    Microsoft's "desktop monopoly".



    Here are some companies that sell Linux computers.

    http://www.systemax.com/divisions.htm
    http://www.microtelpc.com/
    http://www.linuxcertified.com/
    http://www.outpost.com/
    http://www.walmart.com/
    http://www.sub300.com/
    http://www.linare.com/
    http://www.linspire.com/
    http://www.xandros.com/

    http://www.us.debian.org/distrib/pre-installed
    http://www.linux.org/vendor/system/index.html
    cyber_rigger@...
    • RE: Boycott Dell, HP and Gateway

      STFU! Dude all of us are getting f***ing tired of your tirades. You have been biatch slapped several times. now it's my turn. This is NOT how you get people to take up Linux. This IS NOT RELATED TO THE DAMN ARTICLE!

      KITFO!
      Linux User 147560
      • Re: This is NOT how you get people....

        ....because telling people to STFU!, swearing and attempting to "biatch slap" someone whilst wearing the tag "Linux User 147560" has to be the most retarded thing you could have ever done for the Linux community.
        I'm sure you will soon be the toast of Linux supporters everywhere with moronic posts like that one.

        Now,
        It's time to put your keyboard away and go get some fresh air, because by God you need to.
        Scrat
        • RE: Re: This is NOT how you get people....

          I was trying for a mix of No_Axe and YEAHRIGHT and some other character on the boards...
          Linux User 147560
        • Scrat, my hat's off to you.

          If more Linux users would stand up and let the zealots know they are hurting Linux and not helping it Linux would stand a much better chance of acceptance.
          No_Ax_to_Grind
      • Agreement, but

        What could help immensely would be getting our congressmen and senators to force the DOJ to enforce the laws against cartels.

        In a telephone reply to a letter, I had a DELL spokesman inform me that Dell would not violate their industry wide agreement with Microsoft. This is the very definition of a CARTEL.

        Linux will advance quickly when it is possible to go to any office supply store and buy a computer that is preloaded with Linux. It might also help if the outside of the box was required to carry a large print notice about any BIOS restrictions on what operating system can be loaded onto the hardware inside, or about the existence of a specific LSI chip that performed this restrictive function.
        Update victim
        • DOJ has nothing to do with it.

          Sorry, ther is no price fixing (MS Windows pricing for top tier OEMs is APPROVED by the courts.)

          You guys that keep hollering for the DOJ to do their job need to come to grips their job is not to be vigilanties.
          No_Ax_to_Grind
        • Linux not ready for office supply store

          [i]Linux will advance quickly when it is possible to go to any office supply store and buy a computer that is preloaded with Linux.[/i]

          [b]If[/b] the demand is there, the office supply stores will carry pre-loaded Linux systems. But why should they? As a techie (the subgroup of the population most likely to want Linux), I wouldn't buy a system from an office supply store -- I would more likely build it myself or buy it online.

          Secondly, the office supply store has to worry about customer support. At this point, Linux is not where it is easy for Grandma to use. Especially if after buying the system Grandma wonders over to the software section and picks up two or three edu-games for the grandkids.
          __howard__
          • Linux Was Already Offred Pre-Loaded from Office Stores

            Back in 1999-2000 Linux was offered from Best Buy and Circuit City. There was a Catch 22 though. The machines were higher end, At the time BB would give you a lower end Celeron computer for a 2 year subscription to AOL/MSN after all the Rebates, but the Linux computers cost 2,000 with No rebates Available. Also the sales people would do darn well everthing to talk you out of Linux and make it as unatractive as possible. When I went into one store the sales-person actually asked me why I wanted to run that "Crap"-- Not a good way to make a buy on a high end machine.

            I noticed that in paticular Best Buy salespoeple tend to try to push "certain" technologies. For example I went in to purchase Homeplug back about a year or two ago. Yes Best Buy had the bridges but they only had 1 Bridge per store (Useless, as you need at least 1 for each computer or device you want to network). Also both the Geek Squad dork and the salesperson tried their hardest to talk me out of it claiming everything from the 14 MB connection would be slow for a 1.5MB DSL connection to claiming that the Washing Machine and Microwave would effect the network speed (None of it is true BTW). I ended up going to Comp USA where they;

            1. Didn't lie to me
            2. Actually had a supply of Homeplug bridges (They also had HPNA).

            Anyhow Wal-Mart used to carry Mandrake in store and most Computer stores still carry Suse or RedHat. Wal-Mart has sinced dropped Mandrake from the shelves but they have also dropped Corel Family Pack, Roxio/MGI PhotoSuite, MS Office, MS Windows, ect. In Fact Wal-Mart, at least the ones I go to, now only have MS Works, 601 Office Suite ($25 and it includes the PDF Plugin and SpellCheck Dict), ANti-Virus software, Learn X Language, Design X Room, CD/DVD Burning software, Anti_virus/Firewall/Maint software, and Games.

            Go to Borders or Walden Books and you will find half a dozen Books with Linux Distros With Various Flavors along with 500p manuals that cover just about every aspect of using it. Grandma would have an esier time with a Modern Linux Distro than Windows. Grandma in paticulare would have an easier time at it as Grandma would probably only want to E-Mail, Surf the Web, Word processing, and light Image Editing, which is all included in most Linux Distros. The only hard part for Grandma would be getting the Internet Connection up... If they are using Broadband it is as easy as plugging the ethernet cable in and turning DHCP on if not on by defualt. Most of the DSL providers (The Bells Are at least) are using 2Wire DSL modems which come with built in setup software (Built into the switch) called 2Wire Green Light. Grandma would have equal dificulty setting up said DSL connection on Windows.

            As far as your educational game software scenerio Grandma wouldn't have to go to the store for it as Linux distros tend to be loaded with puzzle and educational games. In fact Linux surpasses Windows with its offerings of edu games and puzzle games (A bulk of the Linux Games are Edu or Puzzle along with generic shot-ups and platformers tossed in). Grandma would not need to purchase edu games as she already has them in her distro or distros defualt repository. Now Grandma would not be able to purchase the latest smut-filled violance laden drug dealing theft loaded potty-mouth game- but for some reason I think Grandma might be keen on the idea that grandson can't play said game, at least on her computer.
            Ed_Meyers
          • Linux isn't ready for Grandma; Grandma isn't ready for Linux

            I apologize in advance for using two different posts by the same author.

            [i]The naming conventions can be resolved, and are resolved, using symbolic links. The .Deb Vs. .RPM issue is resolved using Alien (BTW Debian is LBS compliant becuase of Alien).[/i]

            Do you really think Grandma even understands 1/2 what is being said in your paragraph? Heck, do you think even 1/2 the supposedly techie ZD-net audience unerstands your comment enough to take advantage of it?


            [i]At the time BB would give you a lower end Celeron computer for a 2 year subscription to AOL/MSN after all the Rebates,[/i]

            The rebates were being offered by AOL and MSN. The "free system" craze was financed by such gimics.


            [i] In fact Linux surpasses Windows with its offerings of edu games[/i]

            I respectfully disagree. Is Reader Rabbit, Arthur's Computer Adventures, Alphabet Express Preschool, Carmen Sandiego, Seaseme Street available for Linux? This is what Grandma wants to buy the little tikes. This is what the little tikes are brainwashed by TV to want.


            Please. I'm not knocking Linux. I use it myself and am a big fan. But let's be honest. We still have work to do before Grandma is going to be comfortable with it.
            __howard__
          • Yes those titles are ported to Linux and not a problem on 1 distro

            Look, if you stick within your distro you don't need to know how to fix these not so complicated things... Uhm with current versions of Gnome to create a symbolic link its a right click>Create Symbolic Link. If you are old school you can open up the CMD Terminal and ln -s directorywhereitisat directoryforthelink

            Creating a symbolic link is not that hard to begin with.

            Reader Rabbit does indeed have a Linux version.http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B000068NNK/qid=1125272049/br=1-1/ref=br_lf_sw_1//102-2592258-5088914?v=glance&s=software&n=285161

            The Sesame Street titles also have been ported to Linux.

            http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/browse/-/465882/102-2592258-5088914

            You assume there are no commercial apps for Linux let alone commercial games. There are also Arthur titles that run natively in Linux.

            Also there is Childsplay, GnuCompris, Pingus, Tux of Math Command, Tux Math Scrabble, Tux Paint, Ect Ect which are all free.

            The problem wasn't that the MSN/AOL Deals, It was Linux was only offered as pre-install on the most expensive systems and was installed cost more than the comprable MS workstation (Becuase they had to pay for MS Windows on top of installing Linux for the machines- This was before the DOJ settlement)
            Ed_Meyers
          • Earthlink is ready for Linux (and grandma)

            Here's the chance for grandma.

            Earthlink will even help you buy a Linux PC.

            http://www.microtelpc.com/

            The argument that Linux isn't ready for grandma
            is total BS.
            cyber_rigger@...
          • Glad to see Linux supported by 3rd party apps

            [i]Uhm with current versions of Gnome to create a symbolic link its a right click>Create Symbolic Link. If you are old school you can open up the CMD Terminal and ln -s directorywhereitisat directoryforthelink

            Creating a symbolic link is not that hard to begin with.[/i]

            You're looking at the problem as a techie. I'm trying to look at it from the point of view of a mass consumer. The mass consumer doesn't even understand what a symbolic link is, let alone which ones are needed.

            [i]Reader Rabbit does indeed have a Linux[/i]

            Excellent. The Learning Company should be commended and supported for their support of Linux. (And my original point is that HP should be commended and supported for their support of Linux.)

            [i]You assume there are no commercial apps for Linux let alone commercial games.[/i]

            Yes. I did assume this because the games that I was looking for, when I was looking for them, weren't there. As soon as Battlefield shows up on Linux, my Windows boot partition goes away.

            [i]...It was Linux was only offered as pre-install on the most expensive systems ... This was before the DOJ settlement[/i]

            So we're talking about ancient history and a business mistake on the part of the big box stores?

            From HP and, last I checkd, Dell, offered Linux PCs less for less than the comparable Windows PC, so it looks like they learned from the others' mistakes.
            __howard__
    • Natering nabob of negativism

      Your spam has improved in content but I've demonstrated repeatedly that your headline is misleading and counterproductive. Telling people to boycott is telling people to keep their money in the bank. That's the wrong approach. If you want Linux on a consumer machine then argue for consumers to buy pre-installed Linux and make that argument in your headline. Big companies don't push consumer machines with Linux pre-installed because they don't see people spending money on it. Show them the market.

      Hitting the WRONG COMPANIES

      HP is a huge friend of open source that sells desktop machines running Linux where you don't have to pay any Microsoft tax. OK, they call them 'Workstations' and market to businesses. I'll bet they're doing it that way because of the way MS charges OEM's for XP. You can get one of their desktop Linux machines for around $1k. A lot of HP equipment has open source drivers and HP is actively funding the development of open source drivers for equiptment where they haven't already provided them. Seriously, STOP HITTING THESE GUYS!

      Dell at least supports Linux on their machines. That's more than I can say for Sony (... as I type away on my Sony laptop running SuSE).
      palmwarrior
      • Spiro, I didn't know that you were still around, however

        what you have claimed is not my experience with either HP or DELL. Perhaps this is because I am looking from a strictly personal home user point of view, but I have found that if I wish to use anything except Microsoft or Apple, I have to build my own system.

        I tried a Walmart Linspire system. It was not expandable and failed within one week. The manufacturer was NOT a major name.
        Update victim
        • Would you like me to provide the links for you?

          To the Dell and HP linux support sites???
          No_Ax_to_Grind
        • You can buy Linux boxes from HP and Dell

          [i]what you have claimed is not my experience with either HP[/i]

          And your experience isn't mine ... I have an HP Linux box.
          __howard__
      • HP does really support and invest in Linux

        [i]HP is a huge friend of open source that sells desktop machines running Linux[/i]

        No kidding. At http://h10018.www1.hp.com/wwsolutions/linux/index.html HP has lots to offer in the Linux areana. It looks like you can get Red Had, Novell/SUSE, Turbolinux, and Mandrake.

        Merely a nit, you can get a Linux box for $333 from HP -- of course it won't be a great gaming machine.
        __howard__
      • STOP HITTING THESE GUYS! why?

        You know as well as anyone that these companies are continuing to protect Micosoft's desktop.
        cyber_rigger@...
        • Nonsense

          These guys are trying to sell hardware. Some people want to buy the hardware with Linux, most want to buy it with Windows. They aren't stupid enough to stop selling Windows boxes because then they would go out of business. It has nothing to do with "protecting" Microsoft.

          [b]If[/b] they did not offer alternatives, then you might have a point. They [b]do[/b] offer alternatives and, at least in HP's case, spend huge amounts on Linux R&D. They [b]are[/b] trying to promote Linux as well.

          Not only that, the Linux box is sold for less than the Windows box -- so how can they be protecting Windows?

          Your bigotry of "if you sell or support Windows, you must hate Linux" is getting in the way of your ability to see groups who do support Linux, but also must remain in business.
          __howard__