iPad takes 500 foot drop from airplane, G-Form Extreme Sleeve saves the day

iPad takes 500 foot drop from airplane, G-Form Extreme Sleeve saves the day

Summary: Those wacky dudes at G-Form are at it again.

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TOPICS: iPad, Mobility
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Those wacky dudes at G-Form are at it again.

Apparently, they aren't content enough to torture iPads with 12 pound bowling ball impacts from three feet. Oh no. They had to up the ante.

As if that wasn't a convincing enough reason to pre-order an Extreme Sleeve for your iPad, they had to go and do something completely gonzo -- drop it from 500 feet in the air in an ultralight aircraft.

The result? iPad lived to play a video yet another day. I'm impressed, very impressed.

With all of these impact stunts, I'm beginning to think these dudes are the computer industry version of Jackass. What else can they possibly do to prove this product works as advertised? Fire it out of a cannon into Johnny Knoxville's nads?

Hey, here's an idea. Maybe they can figure out how to save the RIM BlackBerry PlayBook from a 30,000 foot app-less sales nosedive before the Android compatibility comes out this summer.

Are you impressed with the G-Form Extreme Sleeve yet? Talk Back and Let Me Know.

Topics: iPad, Mobility

About

Jason Perlow, Sr. Technology Editor at ZDNet, is a technologist with over two decades of experience integrating large heterogeneous multi-vendor computing environments in Fortune 500 companies. Jason is currently a Partner Technology Strategist with Microsoft Corp. His expressed views do not necessarily represent those of his employer.

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20 comments
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  • 500 foot drop

    I would like to see them drop it on asphalt and from what I could see it's pretty much useless in sunlight unless of course the fall did damage the screen.
    nehmeg
    • RE: iPad takes 500 foot drop from airplane, G-Form Extreme Sleeve saves the day

      @nehmeg

      If you fell 500 feet into the deep end of a filled swimming pool or into a drained swimming pool, the outcome would be about the same.

      Likewise, an iPad falling 500 feet onto a patch of grass or onto an asphalt surface without some sort of protection would produce the same destroyed tablet.

      But, one observation you made is correct. Both the iPad1 and the iPad2 screens are really not suitable for outdoor use. They are not as poor as some LCD screens I've witnessed in the past but they are quite inferior to Kindle screens, for example.
      kenosha77a
      • RE: iPad takes 500 foot drop from airplane, G-Form Extreme Sleeve saves the day

        @kenosha7777 that's a negative, even if the result would be a destroyed tablet, the difference in forces would be considerable (when calculated :))
        nimd4
      • Although it's been awhile since my last high school physics class

        @nimd4

        I wasn't really concerned with calculating the actually forces involved at the moment of impact between an iPad hitting an asphalt or grass surface. Certainly, the amount of kinetic energy at impact is the same for the iPad in both scenarios. But how much of that force is absorbed by each surface is hard to calculate. (just too many variables involved)

        My point was to compare the probable results from a human hitting a watery surface (or a cement surface) from 500 feet with the results from an unprotected iPad drop experiment from 500 feet to either that grassy surface or the asphalt surface scenario.

        In all cases, the probable result would either be a "wrecked" human or a "wrecked iPad".

        To put that 500 feet into perspective, the total height of the Golden Gate Bridge above water is 746 ft. The height from the water to the Golden Gate Bridge road deck is 245 feet. (According to Wikipedia)

        Falling 245 feet from the Golden Gate Bridge to the watery surface below usually results in a "one time event" for the jumper. (Let alone falling from 500 feet or 746 feet.)

        Likewise, I wouldn't give odds of a successful outcome if an iPad fell onto either surface from a ten story building (100 ft) let alone a drop of 500 feet.
        kenosha77a
  • Playbook Android app compatiblity or a native email app

    Which will come first?

    You know .. I have nothing against RIM or their loyal customers but I have to say, this has been one klutzy product launch so far.
    kenosha77a
  • Ouch Re:

    Maybe they can figure out how to save the RIM BlackBerry PlayBook from a 30,000 foot app-less sales nosedive before the Android compatibility comes out this summer.

    Ludo
    Ludovit
  • RE: iPad takes 500 foot drop from airplane, G-Form Extreme Sleeve saves the day

    They had me sold with the bowling ball demo. I pre-ordered one last week.
    Arsenal_Fan
    • RE: iPad takes 500 foot drop from airplane, G-Form Extreme Sleeve saves the day

      @kmurk Why? were you planning on dropping a bowling ball on yours??? That's a good reason to buy one. It's not the apps anymore!!!
      nehmeg
  • Terminal velocity

    At 500 feet terminal velocity is reached. At this point they might as well do 10,000 feet. A drop to asphalt would be interesting as it's instant stop as opposed to grass which has some give and g forces are reduced.

    However 5 feet to asphalt or concrete should be ok by the looks of this.
    dave01234
    • RE: iPad takes 500 foot drop from airplane, G-Form Extreme Sleeve saves the day

      @dave@... actually terminal velocity is reached when there's 0 acceleration; so your rough estimate depends on a lot of factors, really - but nice try.
      nimd4
  • RE: iPad takes 500 foot drop from airplane, G-Form Extreme Sleeve saves the day

    Whatever others say about landing on grass, consider the fact that it also landed on it side where it's weight and terminal velocity are magnified on a smaller surface......I'm impressed!
    bigmo7
  • lava

    I wish they'd drop it in lava, <ii>then I'd be impressed.</i>
    WriterOfCode
    • RE: iPad takes 500 foot drop from airplane, G-Form Extreme Sleeve saves the day

      @WriterOfCode

      I'm betting it would survive the initial landing but how would you retrieve it in time to prove anything? Grin.
      kenosha77a
    • RE: iPad takes 500 foot drop from airplane, G-Form Extreme Sleeve saves the day

      @WriterOfCode
      I'll bet if you purchase one and send it in you can probably talk them into it. I doubt the case will protect it. But if you've got money to burn (lol), they might be willing to do it just for the fun of it.

      Something tells me you're not interested in the spending the money though.
      V1R4L
  • Whatever...

    A few thoughts on this:
    First, dropping it on soft turf? I'd like to see if an unprotected iPad would fare just as well.
    Second, it has surely reached terminal-velocity by the time it has fallen five hundred feet... so why not just up the ante and drop it from five *thousand*?
    joe@...
    • Whatever...

      @joe@...

      Ha, because a drop from 5000 feet would mean they had to find it when it landed... iPad sniffing dogs anyone?
      bwarbuck
    • RE: iPad takes 500 foot drop from airplane, G-Form Extreme Sleeve saves the day

      @joe@... probably because the FAA would take a *very* dim view of dropping things from that height. <smile> OTOH, I'm sure that the armed forces are looking at this stuff and think of all sorts of uses!
      G_Writer
  • RE: iPad takes 500 foot drop from airplane, G-Form Extreme Sleeve saves the day

    Solution: Wing app.
    trm1945
    • RE: iPad takes 500 foot drop from airplane, G-Form Extreme Sleeve saves the day

      @trm1945
      "Solution: Wing app. "
      A Pad with wings? Now where have I heard of that before ;-p
      NZJester
      • RE: iPad takes 500 foot drop from airplane, G-Form Extreme Sleeve saves the day

        @NZJester

        Good one! Now, where have I seen the following letters (NZ) before? Grin.
        kenosha77a