Project Blade Runner: The user experience of 2019

Project Blade Runner: The user experience of 2019

Summary: How far do you think we are from our 2019 vision of the personal computer?

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Jason Perlow and I started with a premise: What would computers look like in the year 2019, the future setting of Ridley Scott's 1982 seminal work, Blade Runner?

We decided that mere speculation was an old, hackneyed method, and instead set out to actually design a new computer system based on existing technologies projected through 8 years of development and improvement.

Therefore we present to you Project Blade Runner, the next generation of personal computing. Sit back and listen as we discuss the roadmap for the future of computing technology.

Project Blade Runner 2019 Podcast

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Topics: Processors, Browser, CXO, Hardware, Servers

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64 comments
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  • RE: Project Blade Runner: Podcast

    I'd trust an optical keyboard even less than a touchscreen one. I know that they exist, and are cool as hell, but the fact remains that nothing can replace a tactile response. Other than that, I don't really see much different from a normal PC today, other than the curved screen that seems to want to kill me.
    Aerowind
    • RE: Project Blade Runner: Podcast

      @Aerowind That is simply a conceptual image from the artist working on the designs with us. Have you listened to the podcast or read Jason's article yet?
      Scott Raymond
      • Please do not forget to name yourself in the beginnings of podcasts

        @Scott Raymond: so listeners would easier grasp who talks to whom.
        DDERSSS
      • RE: Project Blade Runner: Podcast

        @denisrs Quite right, my apologies. That's Jason who does the introduction. Unfortunately my laptop mic wasn't that great. However, for future podcasts I will have a professional-grade microphone that will improve quality dramatically.
        Scott Raymond
      • RE: Project Blade Runner: Podcast

        @Scott Raymond Sorry, I didn't actually see a podcast, though that's probably more because of Websense than anything on your end.
        Aerowind
      • RE: Project Blade Runner: Podcast

        @Scott Raymond What i want to know is why no yet has co<a href="http://vb.maas1.com/">m</a>bine a optical keyboard wi<a href="http://www.tran33m.com/vb/">t</a>h a tablet with a stand built into the back of a tablet. I thought about various designs myself and would probably pick up such a table if it was on sell.The image does look cool through.
        alasiri8
    • I agree: no 'virtual' keyboard ...

      @Aerowind : can replace a tactile one -- at least, not yet. On the other hand, there's very little evidence in the Project's design that even considers touch capability for navigation or other purposes. I could see the Project machine on the market in just 3 to 4 years, but grossly obsolete by 2019.
      Vulpinemac
  • RE: Project Blade Runner: Podcast

    I think you could have focussed more on what future technology means from a user perspective. For example 4k computer monitors? How does that change the work with the computer? What does it make possible,...
    kikl
    • RE: Project Blade Runner: Podcast

      @kikl Jason's article focuses on the technical aspect. On Monday, I am posting a follow-up article that shows how all of this affects the end user, and the benefits from the future platform.
      Scott Raymond
      • RE: Project Blade Runner: Podcast

        @Scott Raymond

        It seems that every time the computer doubles in speed, the size of the operating system doubles as well. Therefore, you could have actually booted a Windows 3.1 computer faster than Quad Core running Windows 7 today. Even my latest update of Ubuntu is taking much longer to reboot. I got into home computing in it's infancy and would rather see some more direct hardware programming than all of these abstracted layers of software. Then we will see REAL speed. Remember the C64? It booted in ONE second. The entire screen could change in the snap of a finger. That is partly why there is a small following of ,8 bit users, today .

        Dan Laskowski

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2GWi5-f_vY
        techristian_z
  • RE: Project Blade Runner: Podcast

    Ah, a podcast? Nah, I'm hearing impaired. :(
    Grayson Peddie
    • RE: Project Blade Runner: Podcast

      @Grayson Peddie Fortunately we have articles to go along with the podcast. Read the article by Jason posted earlier today. I will be following up with another article on Monday.
      Scott Raymond
  • hopeful vision

    My hope is that we're not still worried about installing AV software installed on future computers. And I hope our computers aren't spending so much time just updating themselves, not to improve the experience, but just to keep from being broken by others. And I hope that turning a computer on or off is instantaneous.

    Having grown up on Star Trek, I just assumed computers of the future would be omnipresent, accessible by voice command whenever and wherever I was. Judging by how little progress has been made in the last decade, that hope seems very distant. We're still at the "I hope it still boots" stage.

    gary
    gdstark13
  • RE: Project Blade Runner: Podcast

    Ha-ha - Most of my customers will still be runing Windows XP :-)


    so it will look the same as it does today.
    neilpost
    • RE: Project Blade Runner: Podcast

      @neilpost I doubt it, just getting drivers to work on current hardware is a difficult undertaking, let alone systems 8 to 10 years from now. If they're running it, it will be virtualized.
      jperlow
      • RE: Project Blade Runner: Podcast

        @jperlow
        Jason - I still have a number of corporate customers running Windows NT and 2000 (both server and workstation) in production environments, never mind XP, which is much friendler to more modern hardware like SATA.
        neilpost
    • RE: Project Blade Runner: Podcast

      @neilpost corporate customers perhaps. Consumers most likely outside of the geek world no most will have switch to window 10 by then or at least somewhere between 7 and 10. But I do expect slightly higher rates of Linux (Google variety) and IOS to become more numerous and hopefully the OS will become like the browsers wars are today a highly competitive enviroment with lots of choice.
      Knowles2
      • RE: Project Blade Runner: Podcast

        @Knowles2
        Corporate customers, or your Uncle with his Windows 95 Desktop still chuntering along.
        neilpost
  • RE: Project Blade Runner: Podcast

    I'm thinking more like this:

    Your smartphone, with dimensions that are roughly what we have today... but computing power extrapolated out to 2019 proportions.

    Then - even though I always say that in today's world, the Atrix makes no sense (touchscreen OS means it should dock into a tablet, not a netbook) - in the future where we could have all of our computing power/needs in a pocketable device, I'd expect that in 2019, we'd have a dock that does what the Atrix does. With physical keys, because lasers don't do tactile feedback. And with a physical screen - but only to augment what I'd think might be a couple standard features in the future:

    When you don't have a dock (or maybe a mini-dock, just to charge as you work, provide sound output, etc), you'd have a pico-projector built into the back of the phone to project a screen where you'd like, and that laser keyboard - possibly with some features we enjoy today to speed surface-based typing... maybe Swype, word prediction, etc.

    That's what I'd expect in 2019.
    geolemon
    • RE: Project Blade Runner: Podcast

      @geolemon You are right at the moment lasers do not do tactile feed back. But remember hearing about the Japanese research in using ultrasound to provide tactile feed back this could be combine with laser base keyboard.
      Knowles2