Enterprise 2.0 failure: Can you trust Google Grand Central?

Enterprise 2.0 failure: Can you trust Google Grand Central?

Summary: Google recently chose to exit its video sale and rental business, leaving paid customers with nothing. Now, in yet another confidence-battering move, Google has pulled some of the so-called phone numbers for life offered by its Grand Central team, with almost no warning to customers.

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TOPICS: Mobility, Google
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Google recently chose to exit its video sale and rental business, leaving paid customers with nothing. Now, in yet another confidence-battering move, Google has pulled some of the so-called phone numbers for life offered by its Grand Central team, with almost no warning to customers.

I view this as a serious problem. When a company the size of Google sets itself up as quasi-utility (aka, the phone company), does it not take on the burden of a larger responsibility?

Enterprise 2.0 tools, including Grand Central, are relatively easy to build in comparison with traditional, big infrastructure systems; that's one reason these smaller systems tend to be inexpensive. Unfortunately, reliability issues have become part of the Enterprise 2.0 experience, for both technical and business model reasons.

On the one hand, I accept the technical problems, although certainly not with a smile. After all, software systems do break, despite the best of intentions.

However, I do have a serious concern with business models that ignore fundamental responsibilities to the consumer. When Google, or any other company for that matter, offers consumers a "phone number for life," they darn well better mean it.

This failure of that commitment to the consumer is just wrong. All of which leaves me asking, what does Google's "do no evil" slogan actually mean?

[via John Battelle]

Topics: Mobility, Google

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2 comments
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  • E2 Failure

    Why, why and why Micheal you take one company and cover the entire industry with stain? I do not know.

    I was last New Yew York back out, I for that reason I am not going to say I am not trusting the electrical system at all.

    How many times when you call by cell, it cuts off. How many times you listen to in a normal phone call, "all circuits are busy."

    With the same rule you are using every industry is a failure.

    I am not asking you as a person, you are a media that is listen to some readers including me. I do not think you are being fear in your judgment.

    We have to realize that beyond our opinions, the American people are investing good money to make this happen. Name a large high tech company in Europe or in Asia. But if you and me and rest of the crowd continue in your position, the capital is going to land some other place.

    Globalization is what it has, changing the capital to other market is one call away.


    Mario Ruiz
    @ http://www.oursheet.com
    Nabukaz
    • The E2.0 failure issue is real

      Mario, I do appreciate your points and recognize what you are saying. At the same time, I'm seeing enough data points, each representing a specific company, to call it a pattern.

      Regarding your point about investment, I am less concerned than you are. I am absolutely not questioning the basic value of Enterprise 2.0 products -- quite the contrary, I think the trend to providing increased consumer service at lower and lower prices is fantastic. Like you, I want that trend, and the associated investment, to continue.

      Nonetheless, I think these companies need to shoulder their responsibilities. This is particularly true with a company such as Google. We are hardly talking "startup", in this case.

      Thanks for adding your views, and I encourage you to continue doing so.
      mkrigsman@...