Lucy Sherriff

Lucy Sherriff is a journalist, science geek and general liker of all things techie and clever. In a previous life she put her physics degree to moderately good use by writing about science for that other tech website, The Register. After a bit of a break, it seemed like a good time to start blogging about weird quantum stuff for ZDNet. And so here we are.

Latest Posts

US Airforce investigates holographic quantum computers

The US Airforce wants to build a holographic quantum computer, and rather than spending a whole chunk of time going right back to fundamentals, it is working on ways of doing it with off-the-shelf parts and panes of glass.The researchers set out their plans in a paper published in Physics ArXiv.

December 22, 2011 by Lucy Sherriff

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Entanglement on a chip: Real world quantum computing

Scientists in Bristol have built and demonstrated a working, programmable photonic chip that "generates manipulates and measures entanglement and mixture". The scientists, whose work is published in Nature Photonics, describe their work as "a major step forward towards optical quantum computing".

December 12, 2011 by Lucy Sherriff

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Diamonds demo quantum entanglement on a macro scale

Researchers working in the UK’s Clarendon Laboratory at Oxford have demonstrated long range quantum entanglement in two synthetic diamonds, at room temperature.Those last words are the really important ones, because quantum entanglement is a very fragile thing, and generally needs a super chilly environment to be stable.

December 6, 2011 by Lucy Sherriff

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Graphene ribbons to replace copper on chips?

Not content with taking on the might of silicon, now graphene in all its two-dimensional glory is giving the evil eye to copper. According to an announcement from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, graphene is a promising candidate to replace copper as the size of circuitry on chips shrinks ever smaller.

November 20, 2011 by Lucy Sherriff

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Batteries boosted with silicon-graphene layers

Researchers have found a way to make lithium ion batteries hold a charge ten times greater than they do at present, and charge ten times faster. To do this they have had to overcome some limitations of wonder-material graphene.

November 17, 2011 by Lucy Sherriff

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Silicon challenges diamond for quantum computing crown

Regular readers may remember the nitrogen vacancy in diamond turning out to be a useful "defect", because even at room temperature it could maintain a spin state for long enough to function as quantum memory.This neat trick prompted researchers to go hunting for similar behaviour around defects in other semiconductors, and now it looks like they’ve found one – in silicon carbide.

November 2, 2011 by Lucy Sherriff

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Silicon challenges diamond for quantum computing crown

Regular readers may remember the nitrogen vacancy in diamond turning out to be a useful "defect", because even at room temperature it could maintain a spin state for long enough to function as quantum memory.This neat trick prompted researchers to go hunting for similar behaviour around defects in other semiconductors, and now it looks like they’ve found one – in silicon carbide.

November 2, 2011 by Lucy Sherriff

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