Lucy Sherriff

<p>Lucy Sherriff is a journalist, science geek and general liker of all things techie and clever. In a previous life she put her physics degree to moderately good use by writing about science for that other tech website, The Register. After a bit of a break, it seemed like a good time to start blogging about weird quantum stuff for ZDNet. And so here we are. </p>

Latest Posts

Etch-A-Sketch inspires single electron transistor

Etch-A-Sketch inspires single electron transistor

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh, HP Labs and UW Madison, have built a single electron transistor that will operate with the addition of just one or two more electrons.The new device, hailed as a potential building block for ever smaller and denser memory devices, and even quantum computers, was created with an atomic scale "Etch-a-Sketch" developed by Prof.

published April 20, 2011 by

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Nobel prize winner waves magnetic wand over graphene

Nobel prize winner waves magnetic wand over graphene

Professor Andre Geim, one of the researchers awarded the Nobel prize for his work with Graphene, announced yesterday that he and his team at the University of Manchester have successfully magnetised graphene using a flow of electrons.The work has been described as a potentially huge breakthrough in the field of spintronics, as it "offers numerous opportunities for redesigning current spintronics devices and making new ones such as spin-based transistors" per the university’s announcement.

published April 15, 2011 by

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IBM clocks graphene transistor at 155GHz

IBM clocks graphene transistor at 155GHz

IBM has demonstrated a new super whizzy graphene transistor, clocking in at 155GHz, up from the 100GHz it benched last year.The breakthrough was made possible because the transistor was set on a substrate of "diamond-like carbon", itself layered on a commercial silicon wafer.

published April 10, 2011 by

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Graphene adds self-cooling to list of super powers

Graphene adds self-cooling to list of super powers

Graphene, twice threatened by silicon's atom-thick offspring silicene, the pretender to its carbon throne, has hit back with yet another amazing characteristic: transistors made from the atom-tick carbon mesh will cool themselves.Heat is the bane of the electronics industry’s life.

published April 5, 2011 by

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Physicists set new quantum entanglement world record

Physicists set new quantum entanglement world record

Physicists at the University of Innsbruck report a world record in quantum computing: controlled entanglement of 14 atoms to produce 14 qubits, the largest quantum register ever produced.We hesitate in bringing you this news, as the press release is dated April 1st.

published April 3, 2011 by

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Silicene raises new challenge to graphene's throne

Silicene raises new challenge to graphene's throne

Graphene's chief rival silicene, has been given another boost as scientists in Japan have found a new way to manufacture atom-thin sheets of silicon.The idea that silicon could exist in two dimensional sheets was first mooted back in 2007, when researchers from Wright University in Ohio dubbed the then hypothetical material “silicene”.

published March 30, 2011 by

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Quantum switch keeps photons tangled in fibre

Quantum switch keeps photons tangled in fibre

Researchers at Northwestern University have built a switch that can route qubits, paving the way for quantum networking, and maybe one day (per Wired) a quantum internet.The all-optical switch is capable of routing entangled photons along standard, telecom grade fibre-optic cables, without the entanglement breaking down.

published March 14, 2011 by

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Antennae signal new qubit architecture

Antennae signal new qubit architecture

Quantum computing may be only just out of the realms of science fiction, but already there is an issue for a standards body to address. Researchers in Austria have come up with a totally new architecture for the exchange of quantum information: quantum antennae.

published February 28, 2011 by

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Who needs lithography? Read data with organic molecules

Who needs lithography? Read data with organic molecules

Brace yourself for a new wave of hard disk sensors and more power efficient hard drives, thanks to the world’s smallest ever magnetic field sensor developed by researchers at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and the Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg (IPCMS).

published February 24, 2011 by

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