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Natalie Gagliordi

Natalie Gagliordi is a staff writer for CBS Interactive based in Louisville, Kentucky, covering business technology for ZDNet. She previously worked as the editor of Kiosk Marketplace, an online B2B trade publication that focused on interactive self-service technology, while also contributing to additional websites that covered retail technology, digital signage hardware and mobile payment trends. Natalie attended George Washington University, where she studied communication sciences, and also the University of South Florida, where she received a B.A. in News-Editorial Journalism.

Latest Posts

Networking and security step up in Feb IT priorities rankings

February 1, 2006 by in Security

Networking and security step up in Feb IT priorities rankings

Below is a summary of the latest findings from our monthly IT Priorities survey: •Software infrastructure remains the top initiative: Software infrastructure projects averaged 23% of IT spending in the last 12 months, but spending is expected to dip to 19% in the following year. Current spending on ERP projects averaged 28% of enterprise software spending, directory services projects are 14%, with CRM solutions at 11% in the last 12 months.

Top 10 white paper downloads in 2005

January 3, 2006 by in Cisco

Top 10 white paper downloads in 2005

First, Happy New Year from the ZDNet Research team! Using our BT trax tool we took a look at all the activity in our directory of over 57,000 white papers, case studies, Webcasts and other downloadable resources over the past year.

Microsoft getting serious about BI

December 19, 2005 by in Microsoft

Microsoft getting serious about BI

Although late, Microsoft is keeping up with its promises in the Business Intelligence (BI) space, says Gartner, with new products and capabilities that will appeal mostly to the traditional application developer community and departmental IT customers. According to a recent Gartner report  (client reg.

Intel getting some flak for criticizing $100 laptop

December 16, 2005 by in Laptops

Intel getting some flak for criticizing $100 laptop

When Intel CEO Craig Barrett remarked, "People with a $100 notebook computer will get the computer they deserve,” in regards to MIT's ambitious project currently underway, some didn't take it lightly. RedMonk analyst James Governor points to and supports the opposite viewpoint from blogger, Nidahas: Anyone who has the basic understanding of the level of IT penetration in developing nations and the reasons for those poor figures can give plenty of reasons for their introduction.

Why iPod trademarks are the real road to value

December 14, 2005 by in Apple

Why iPod trademarks are the real road to value

Patent wielding competitors lusting over the huge success of Apple's iPod digital music player should put down their litigation swords and figure out what gives the product its X-factor in the first place. Core77, a site for industrial design fanatics, has a great analysis of Apple's design strategy by James Conley, a Clinical Professor at both the Kellogg School of Management and the McCormick School of Engineering at Northwestern University.

SOA 101

November 15, 2005 by in Enterprise Software

SOA 101

You've been hearing about it more and more, so if you are new to service-oriented architectures (SOA) and want the full scoop but not ready to start connecting the dots between terms like BPEL, WS-Policy, and WSIF, then read this (free PDF)  four-page overview from Nucleus Research.

Adopting ITIL? Read this

November 4, 2005 by in CXO

Adopting ITIL? Read this

Saw some great ITIL (IT Infrastructure Library) quotes recently gathered from our readers in a presentation the senior management team was about to deliver to a client. The best practice framework for treating IT like a business can be approached in piecemeal and not all components need to be adopted, so progress can vary greatly.

Apple's  predatory supply chain

October 24, 2005 by in Apple

Apple's predatory supply chain

AMR Research’s Bruce Richardson writes about what he calls "predatory supply chains," situations where manufacturers through exclusive contracts monopolize key inputs leaving competitors high and dry, especially in new growth markets. Richardson introduces the idea with Apple's iPod.

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