Shock as tech news site researches own story

Shock as tech news site researches own story

Summary: Kudos to InfoWorld for researching and breaking its story about the sudden-death vulnerability built into every Oracle database. This is a classic piece of technology journalism, researched over a two-month period during which the editorial team "conducted our own tests, verified information with sources we believe to be reliable, and consulted extensively with Oracle itself.

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Kudos to InfoWorld for researching and breaking its story about the sudden-death vulnerability built into every Oracle database. This is a classic piece of technology journalism, researched over a two-month period during which the editorial team "conducted our own tests, verified information with sources we believe to be reliable, and consulted extensively with Oracle itself."

Such in-depth and professional journalistic research is so rare in today's instant-gratification world of Techmeme-fueled technology reporting that Business Insider found it hard to grok exactly what was happening: "In a weird twist of events, the hole was actually found by Infoworld, a news site that covers the tech industry ..."

Wow, a news site actually researching its own stories — how weird is that? Apparently that is such an old-fashioned concept that today's tech bloggers find it outlandish, so inured they are to their role as echo chambers for other people's press releases, product launches and rumor mills. But then of course, as we all know, enterprise software is utterly boring and today's media has far more entertaining matters to concern itself with. Who cares that a multi-billion dollar software company has been covering up a product flaw that could bring mission-critical processes at major corporations to a sudden, shuddering halt?

Of course this is in fact a hugely significant story and although the majority of tech coverage today is simply asleep at the switch when it comes to the really important topics, fortunately the team at InfoWorld had the courage and the patience to invest in ferreting out the truth of this story.

Topics: Hardware, Browser, Data Centers, Data Management, Enterprise Software, Security, Software, Storage

Phil Wainewright

About Phil Wainewright

Since 1998, Phil Wainewright has been a thought leader in cloud computing as a blogger, analyst and consultant.

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6 comments
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  • RE: Shock as tech news site researches own story

    Think you could add the conscience and class to hold the story while the Company involved prepared a fix to protect their customers! Good job Infoworld!
    mollyfud
  • How ironic...

    ...that in commenting on this story you are "to their role as echo chambers for other people???s press releases, product launches and rumor mills".

    Isn't that just what you did in talking about this story? :)
    wolf_z
  • RE: Shock as tech news site researches own story

    The "press releases, product launches and rumor mills" are why I take most blogs and internet journalism with a grain of salt and will occasionally post a snarky comment. Serious aggregator like Google and Drudge deserve credit. HuffPo gets a little too editorial.
    Bill4
  • Certainly no shock that Oracle software has zillions of bugs and heaping

    piles of security holes though. Youd think their users would expect more for the butt reaming prices. I guess the smart ones have already switched.
    Johnny Vegas
  • RE: Shock as tech news site researches own story

    Thanks Phil for highlighting this story.
    I hope the other publications see the kudos that InfoWorld rightly get for this old fashioned investigative journalism. Both the outcome, and the journey to get to the conclusion are an interesting read. I'm sure that the story will be echoed all over the technical blogs.
    Agnostic_OS
  • Thanks

    We at InfoWorld appreciate the kind words from a competitor. In our competitive world, we often privately acknowledge each other's good work, but rarely publicly. So thanks!
    Galen Gruman