Zack Whittaker

Zack Whittaker is the security editor for ZDNet. You can securely reach him on Signal and WhatsApp at 646-755-8849, and his PGP fingerprint for email is: 4D0E 92F2 E36A EC51 DAAE 5D97 CB8C 15FA EB6C EEA5.

Charlie Osborne

Charlie Osborne is a cybersecurity journalist and photographer who writes for ZDNet and CNET from London. PGP Key: AF40821B | Research/security tips email: cingred@protonmail.com.

Jennifer Leggio

Jennifer Leggio has been in the security industry for 17 years as a marketer, advisor, and writer. Her focus is on security culture, including disclosure, community issues, equality in security, disruptive trends, and even marketing best practices. PGP Key: 3A708289 | She prefers other contact on Twitter via @mediaphyter.

Latest Posts

Chinese hackers launch targeted attacks against foreign correspondents

Chinese hackers launch targeted attacks against foreign correspondents

According to an assessment published by the Information Warfare Monitor, Chinese hacktivists (politically motivated hackers) have recently launched a targeted malware attack against foreign news correspondents attempting to trick them into executing a malware-embedded PDF attachment (Interview list.pdf), coming from a non-existent editor working for The Straits Times.

September 29, 2009 by in Security

Scareware scammers hijack Twitter trending topics

Scareware scammers hijack Twitter trending topics

Researchers from F-Secure and Sophos are reporting on an ongoing scareware serving campaign abusing the popular micro-blogging service Twitter.Hundreds of tweets using four different URL shortening services are currently spammed through the automatically registered Twitter accounts, relying on a pseudo-random text generation using Twitter's trending topics.

September 22, 2009 by in Social Enterprise

From Gimmiv to Conficker: The lucrative MS08-067 flaw

From Gimmiv to Conficker: The lucrative MS08-067 flaw

GENEVA -- The critical MS08-067 vulnerability used by the Conficker worm to build a powerful botnet continues to be a lucrative security hole for cyber criminals.During a presentation at the Virus Bulletin 2009 conference here, a trio of Microsoft researchers dissected the malware attacks linked to MS08-067 and found that criminal gangs are still exploiting the flaw to plant data-theft Trojans on vulnerable Windows machines.

September 22, 2009 by in Security

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