Anonymous hacks hundreds of Chinese government sites

Anonymous hacks hundreds of Chinese government sites

Summary: Anonymous has hacked hundreds of Chinese government, company, and other general websites. The attacks range from basic defacements to personal data being compromised.

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Update: China admits Anonymous hacks

The hacktivist group Anonymous now has a Chinese branch. An Anonymous China Twitter account was created late last month, was endorsed by the YourAnonNews Twitter account, which by the way has over 562,000 followers now, and the individuals behind it went to work. Boy have they been busy. Hundreds of Chinese government, company, and other general websites have been hacked and defaced in the span of a few days. A couple have also had their administrator accounts, phone numbers, and e-mail addresses posted publicly. On the hacked sites, the group even posted tips for how to circumvent the Great Firewall of China.

A long Pastebin post lists all the websites that were targeted. It contains 327 websites in total, but an updated list, also on Pastebin, brings that number to 485. Most of these websites are operational once again, but many have been defaced a second time after they were brought back. Not all of them were hacked and defaced; some were treated with more viciousness than others.

A separate Pastebin explains why Anonymous China is executing these attacks. The message is in both English and Chinese. Here's the English version:

Hello, we are Anonymous. All these years the Chinese Government has subjected their people to unfair laws and unhealthy processes. People, each of you suffers from tyranny of that regime.

Fight for justice, fight for freedom, fight for democracy!

In the defaces and leaks in this day, we demonstrate our revolt to the Chinese system. It has to stop! We aren't asking you for nothing, just saying to protest, to revolt yourself, to be the free person you always want to be! So, we are writing this message to tell you that you should protest, you should revolt yourself protesting and who has the skills for hacking and programming and design and other "computer things" come to our IRC: http://2.webchat.anonops.com/ channel: #GlobalRevolution .

We are Anonymous. We are Legion. We do not forgive. We do not forget. Expect us.

Here are the relevant Anonymous China tweets from March 30, 2012:

Mass Deface by Anonymous China (pastebin) -> http://pastebin.com/f7nFSFgq #China and all #World we are just getting started. Anonymous China is not affiliated with the GlobalBlackout Joke. #lulz Thank you to all the support around the World, by Anonymous and 'non-Anonymous'. All the defaces (in the mass deface) nongovernmental are to spread consconsciousness even to the webmasters of their websites. Update: mass deface 480+ (.gov included) http://pastebin.com/uqKbmfmm Message from Anonymous China to the chinese government and the chinese people. http://pastebin.com/hQsQUfHV #GlobalRevolution

The next day, on March 31, it got more serious. Yet another Pastebin post detailed the hack of zssf.gov.cn. This wasn't just a hack resulting defacement though. No. This time, phone numbers and e-mails were leaked. First off, two accounts and their passwords were posted. Next, 548 phone numbers were posted, likely belonging to Chinese officials. This was followed by 860 e-mail addresses. No passwords associated with these e-mail addresses were revealed, however.

Here are the tweets from that day:

Chinese Government, prepare yourself again. ;) http://www.zssf.gov.cn/ leaked/hacked by Anonymous China. Mega Leak with phone numbers, emails, etc. Leak -> http://js.cyberpolice.cn/webpage/search.jsp?%3Fspec%3D0&PARA=%22%27%3E%3Cscript%3Ealert%28document.cookie%29%3C/script%3E%0A&CRY XSS Injection Vuln. x) ???????????? \\ #Anonymous around thw world fighting for justice. #ExpectUs and expect Anonymous China, we're just starting...

At least three of the sites were defaced again more recently, showing exactly how the defacements look like. As you can see in the screenshot at the top of this post, at the time of writing the first and second sites still have the images, text, as well as a song playing in the background (Baba O'Riley by The Who). There's even a link to tips on how to bypass state censorship, on a separate webpage hosted by each of the hacked websites. It is essentially a copy of a post you can view yourself over at hacktivist.me.

The Anonymous message to the Chinese government and the Chinese people that was posted on these two sites, as well as hundreds of others, is in full below:

Hi all !

Message to Chinese government :

All these years, the Chinese Communist government has subjected its People to unfair laws and unhealthy processes. Dear Chinese government, you are not infallible, today websites are hacked, tomorrow it will be your vile regime that will fall. So expect us because we do not forgive, never. What you are doing today to your Great People, tomorrow will be inflicted to you.

With no mercy.

Nothing will stop us, nor your anger nor your weapons. You do not scare us, because you cannot afraid an idea.

Message to Chinese People :

Each of you suffers from the tyranny of that regime which knows nothing about you. We are with you. With you here and now. But also tomorrow and the coming days so promising for your freedom. We will never give up. Don't loose hope, the revolution begins in the heart.

The silence of all other countries highlights the lack of democracy and justice in China. It's unbearable. We must all fight for your freedom.

At the time of writing, the third site now simply has a message (in Chinese) saying it is under maintenance. I believe the owners have regained control again.

Last but certainly not least, tchjbh.gov.cn was hacked last night and the results were posted yet again on Pastebin. One admin user account and password, four phone numbers, and one e-mail address were leaked.

Here are the tweets between April 1 and now:

Chinese hackers , programmers, etc and hackers all over the world, we invite you to be part of Anonymous China, fighting for justice! Haoh defaces and leaks coming... Today, ... Tomorrow, ... And forever! http://cdcbd.gov.cn/ http://www.qnwqdj.gov.cn/ http://www.bbdj.gov.cn/ redefaced lol, your security still suck. Leaks coming ... Chinese government today, attacked again. http://www.tchjbh.gov.cn/ hacked by Anonymous China. Leak -> http://pastebin.com/BijTmUmH

These attacks seem to have come out of nowhere. China's state media recently cracked down on dozens of websites, penalising two popular social networks and detaining six people, but this is nothing new and is constantly happening in the country. How will the Communist government react?

Update: China admits Anonymous hacks

See also:

Topics: Browser, Collaboration, Mobility, Software Development

Emil Protalinski

About Emil Protalinski

Emil is a freelance journalist writing for CNET and ZDNet. Over the years,
he has covered the tech industry for multiple publications, including Ars
Technica, Neowin, and TechSpot.

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32 comments
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  • Finally.....

    the Chinese government is getting a taste of its own medicine. I bet they are in panic mode and rounding up suspected as quickly as possible.
    Test Subject
  • LOL!

    [i]We are Anonymous. We are Legion. We do not forgive. We do not forget. Expect us. [/i]

    Nice "bravado". And I'm guessing the Chineese government has their own -

    We are the People's Republic of China . We are Legion. We do not forgive. We do not forget. Expect to die in the near future.
    William Farrel
    • I guess we'll find out

      One of the questions is: will they actually punish the right people?

      Reply to ChasL:

      What I meant was will the Chinese government catch and punish the actual perpetrators instead of railroading some innocent scapegoats.
      John L. Ries
      • Here are the sites that were hacked

        Good question, you tell me:

        qnwqdj - a social service organization in Dalian. Their website carried news like facilities for the disabled, health care improvement, food safety

        cdcbd - a website for a Chengdu Central Business District development. This website carries promotional information about a new business district under development. There's so little use nobody noticed the site got hacked.
        ChasL
      • The perps seem to be non-Chinese

        How would anyone in China punish these non-Chinese hackers? The obvious crappy machine translated Chinese text shows no Chinese person is actually involved. AnonymousChina is even asking for translation help in a recent tweet.

        If it's tied to anonymous, then it's US-based. The victims in China may be able to pursue Foreign RICO against US entity if money is involved. But I doubt local business, business improvement district, welfare office, whatnot, have the money or interest to pursue it in US courts.

        @heartwood
        Boy did my Foreign RICO Act comment touch a nerve?
        ChasL
      • How very out of date you are

        @ChasL
        "If it's tied to anonymous, then it's US-based."

        If you've been following the news at all, then you'd know that Anonymous is NO LONGER based in the U.S.A. It has spread to Europe, Canada, Australia, Africa, Mexico, South America, the Ukraine, and Russia. It may have started in the U.S., but if all members of Anonymous in the U.S. had been arrested, the group would still exist at sufficiently scary strength.
        mheartwood
    • Brilliant

      AHahah
      Couldnt say better words myself :DDDD
      mingood
  • I knew it

    Anonymous is actually just a bunch of CIA paid blackhats that were told to hack some U.S. sites first so the government could deny any involvement. Now they have been sent out on their real CIA mission...to dismantle China :)
    dtdono0
    • Errr.....

      And how do you explain them hacking US government sites, businesses, etc.? Just so that the CIA can't be blamed? The Chinese will blame the CIA for this, even if Anonymous takes credit. The Chines blame everything bad on the CIA or some other foreign government "inteligence" agency.
      You a conspoiracy nut by any chance?
      Gisabun
      • Sometimes the simplest explination is it

        I guess dtd is suggsting some kind of "false flag" operation, like Gulf of Tonkin. I agree it's bit of a stretch.

        Perhaps the simple explination is Chinese weaka$$ servers have long been exploited, and CNCERT is finally cooperating to help trace the hackerz - thus the revenge.

        The real false flag is that freedom democracy bit - the Chinese are doing well economically, nobody cares about Tiananmen Square. These are obvious Western narratives, demonstrating the fact some hackerz r po'd at the Chinese for crossing them. QED.
        ChasL
    • A 'conspiracy nut' says:

      Anonymous & the suspiciously affiliated Wikileaks/Assange are characters on a stage, pretending to be patriots & advocates of freedom of information/press. They are controlled occupants of popular anarchism/left field journalism. Fictional heroes with the power to influence public opinion, often used like pawns on a chess board as part of a greater plan. So which Russian doll y'all living in?
      th3m3ssiah
  • Machine Translated Chinese Evidence of Non-Chinese Hackers

    Check out the nonsensical sentence in Chinese. Both Google and Bing Translators produce the same translation error from this:

    People, each of you suffers from tyranny of that regime.

    Where the word "suffers" is literally translated as "illness" which a native speaker will not do.

    So spare me the freedom/democracy bit, people in China probably don't want their country overrun by nutty people anymore than we do.
    ChasL
  • Hmmmm.

    Anonymous finally did something right for once.
    Gisabun
  • Very Very Interesting

    Be interesting to see how long this continues......
    rhonin
  • Ah, now this is going to get interesting.

    One "Clan" against another. Now, Lets see how good the chinese gov. hackers really are.
    Nate_K
  • Are Hackers Illiterate?

    Seems to be fairly common with hacker postings - poor grammar, spelling and thought construction. Not sure if these hackers are just dumb as a post, 12 years old, or English is not their primary language. Whatever it is, they should look into spell checkers, or maybe get an adult to edit their rants before posting them.
    jpr75_z
  • Thank you

    As a Chinese, "Thank you very much" is what I can only say.Can you imagine the life that we must use VPN when we want to tweet something, communicate with a friend in Facebook or watch video of Youtube.China have some similar websites like Weibo.com.But there is still a great wall standing between China and many other country,for the reason that government don't want us know "the truth" , or some others.
    I don't think this activity could bring a good influence to China network ,because a people in government just explain that:"This foreigner hacker have made a terrible influence to our network , we have given a lot of freedom to all people in China."Freedom?Are you JOKING?
    After all , we were so happy that you can help us. Maybe it is uselessness. But you have encouraged us. And I hope one day we can communicate with people all over the world without VPN.
    Terrible English...Forgive me...
    RXVincent
    • funny

      i am the chinese too,i really doubt that you are a chinese.of course i acknowledge that the goverment will delete some posters.but it will also happen in u.s too. when you browse the webpage in the us,uk you will come across this too.there is no absolute freedom,even in us and uk.when you threaten the existence of rigme ,every country will do something .and why the west countries and u.s always blame us chinese,there are also many countries worse than china ,i think you can gei more attention on them.
      by the way,if you have no freedom, how can you make the commentary here.
      frank_china
  • as

    As a Chinese, though I love the country, but doesn't love you the way government, I agree, but please do not spread to the broad masses of the people, the masses are innocent, you can invade the government website, we have no opinions, you can publish official number, address, email address. As a Chinese, we have been the subject of government oppression, subject to government repression, dare not parade, not assembly.
    qigai
  • Hater: The Worst Kind of Traitor

    qigai, you're an outright embarrassment to the Chinese people. I'm a Canadian Born Chinese person, and even then, I have a more accurate perception of China's position in the global community than you. Make no mistake that China is on the rise, and will soon become the world's foremost superpower. During that rise to power, other countries, most notably the current superpower(s), will attempt to hinder or corrupt the inevitable outcome. If you are as so naive as to believe that the people are actually "fighting" for you "freedom", you are so very wrong. Other countries, organizations, and people just want to see China crash and burn. They couldn't give two shits about democracy in China. But then I guess your username, "qi gai" which means "beggar" in Chinese, adequately describes your situation. That's the only explanation as to why you are so blindly stupid. I'm not saying that censorship is a good thing. I've lived in China for over 4 years, and have struggled with trying to access Facebook, YouTube, and even Google at times. But as China grows stronger as a nation, which it will, China will gradually open its doors and become less pervasive in the lives of its citizens. The only reason China is doing this now, is due to a fear that the allure of foreign lands will cause its people to become irrational and revolutionary. But when China becomes that alluring foreign land of opportunity, no citizen will want to revolt, and thus the cycle is brought full circle and the government will gradually loose its hold on its people. All of this takes time. Don't forget that China has only been around for 60 years. From a complete market economy with no public control to a mostly free-market with majority public control, China has become increasingly more liberal. It's only a matter of time before that transformation becomes complete. A revolution would only bring China back into the dark ages.
    GareBearCometh