Google looking for anti-malware help

Google looking for anti-malware help

Summary: In the wake of this week's barrage of malware sites poisoning Google results, the search engine giant is asking the public for help reporting malicious Web sites.

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TOPICS: Security, Google, Malware
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In the wake of this week's barrage of malware sites poisoning Google results, the search engine giant is asking the public for help reporting malicious Web sites.

On the official Google security blog,  staff engineer Niels Provos pleads:

Currently, we know of hundreds of thousands of websites that attempt to infect people's computers with malware. Unfortunately, we also know that there are more malware sites out there. This is where we need your help in filling in the gaps. If you come across a site that is hosting malware, we now have an easy way for you to let us know about it. If you come across a site that is hosting malware, please fill out this short form. Help us keep the internet safe, and report sites that distribute malware.

Google's anti-malware team is involved in an effort to identify all web pages on the Internet that could potentially be malicious.

Topics: Security, Google, Malware

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10 comments
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  • How about either SiteAdvisor or Scandoo?

    Take a look at this example when I typed in "screensaver" (without quotes) as a keywood:
    http://g.s.scandoo.com/search?hl=en&meta=on&q=screensaver

    It's a good start.
    Grayson Peddie
    • Perhaps LinkScanner?

      I'm not particularly familiar with Scandoo, but SiteAdvisor is best for determining whether a site is "honest," not whether it is infected. SiteAdvisor tests sites by scanning and filling out forms with throw-away e-mail addresses as they are submitted to the queue by members. They only scan once; the browser toolbar doesn't scan on the fly.

      I'm not saying SiteAdvisor isn't useful; much the contrary. I always check the full report if I'm about to sign up for membership or a newsletter. But as far as detecting legitimate sites that have been compromised just recently, LinkScanner is the tool for the job. Hope this helps!
      santuccie
  • Given the level of activity on Google's various

    user fora, providing users with a simple method for reporting abuse may very well prove effective....

    Henri
    mhenriday
  • RE: Google looking for anti-malware help

    How many people wiill report Microsoft?
    atwood@...
    • Millions

      How many people will report Microsoft?

      Millions....

      I am looking forward to get a huge laugh at the follow up story to this on Microsoft topping the list of Malware sites on the net... I think that even local news stations will pick that up and have fun with it.
      i8thecat
  • RE: Google looking for anti-malware help

    Microsoft, Apple, Adobe, Google and a few more choice websites will lead the pack on most of these list.
    Can't take a crap without Google wanting to install a toolbar on the TP roll. Apple with there hidden updater, as bad as Sun. Adobe with wanting you to install 4 other programs just to get the one you want. Microsoft with the misleading knowledge of their own products.
    Now that Gag..google is showing it's true benefits, I hope it raises some eyebrows to what you think is a good product.
    dbisse@...
    • Think Tank - Google

      AGREE - THAT is why we started a Think Tank - to TRY to get MS G, and Y.

      http://gthinktank.blogspot.com/
      LVKen7
    • It [u]is[/u] odd

      ... that the entity best-known for searching & indexing the Internet better than any other, & ordering in a fraction of a second according to [u]whatever search terms any end-user can imagine[/u], would find scanning within pages for the [u]static code strings[/u] that define malware to be anything but trivially simplistic.
      Absolutely
  • Have they googled it?

    That's step 1 I woulda thought?
    penno2
  • Hmm

    Why doesn't Google just delist these websites with malware and offer webmasters a automated relisting tool that verifies whether or not the malware still exists before relisting said sites? Surely Google can create a algorithm to catch these keyword banks...

    - John Musbach
    John Musbach