Bing continues to slowly gain search market share while Google sees a drop

Bing continues to slowly gain search market share while Google sees a drop

Summary: As the months pass, Bing continues to gain market share over Google in the search market. Here are February 2011's numbers.

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TOPICS: Google
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Compete has reported their numbers for February 2011's search market share and the results are interesting. To quote their post:

 

- With fewer days in February, search query volume across the 5 engines was down nearly 12% MOM.

- The trend for search market share continues with Google losing incremental share (-0.7ppt), while Bing continues to gain share (+1.0ppt).

- All engines except Bing experienced a decline in unique visitors in February, with Bing seeing a 7.6% increase in UVs MOM.

- Bing Powered engines (Yahoo! and Bing) continued to increase its share of market to 30.8%.

- Both ASK and AOL’s share remained flat from January to February.

 

Other companies may provide sets of data that paint a different picture, but if these numbers are accurate, we may well start paying more attention to Bing as SEOs in the not-so-distant future. I'm all for competition and I've maintained time-and-time again that Bing only continues to better itself (which this data clearly supports).

Psst. Hey, Google! Looks like no matter how much or how well you copy Bing's UI ideas, they're still doing it better than you! I kid, I kid. ;) Be sure to visit their post to see a screen shot of the data they provide and feel free to harp away with your opinions below!

Do you think Bing will ever overtake Google as the premier search engine of choice for searchers? What can Google do to get themselves out of the market share slump they're currently in?

Update: It appears as though Compete's numbers are in line with comScore's numbers. Thanks to Mary Jo Foley for the link.

Topic: Google

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77 comments
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  • RE: Bing continues to slowly gain search market share while Google sees a drop

    This was to be expected. Google has dropped the ball on search while trying to focus on other services and leaving the company in a complete mess. Microsoft was focused on Bing, and a simple search will show they have relevant results compared to what you get with Google. Because of that I use Bing exclusively.
    Loverock Davidson
    • nonsense

      @Loverock Davidson
      you use it because it's from microsoft. you can try to fool us but it's not healthy trying to fool yourself.
      sportmac
      • RE: Bing continues to slowly gain search market share while Google sees a drop

        @sportmac
        I use it because it has better results.
        Loverock Davidson
    • RE: Bing continues to slowly gain search market share while Google sees a drop

      @Loverock Davidson
      Bing uses Google search results in their ranking... How low can you get... Typical MS.
      prof123
      • RE: Bing continues to slowly gain search market share while Google sees a drop

        @prof123
        They do not. That was a bunch of upset Google engineers trying to pin their failings on Microsoft, almost like a set up. No one believed them anyway.
        Loverock Davidson
      • Microsoft confirmed that

        @Loverock,<br>No they really do, Microsoft even confirmed the mechanism.<br><br>They track IE toolbar users, they then match the result the user clicked, to the search terms the user made on Google and other search engines.<br><br>Now of course that search term is private information, (we found this from when AOL released a bunch of searches and individual users were identified from it, AOL paid a fine for doing this).<br><br>And Microsoft's privacy claim for this toolbar says they strip private info out, which is clearly false since they use the users search terms!<br><br>Seriously quite appalling misuse of customers private search data and apparently ongoing.<br><br>Read his non denial confirmation here:<br><a href="http://www.bing.com/community/site_blogs/b/search/archive/2011/02/01/thoughts-on-search-quality.aspx" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><a href="http://www.bing.com/community/site_blogs/b/search/archive/2011/02/01/thoughts-on-search-quality.aspx" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://www.bing.com/community/site_blogs/b/search/archive/2011/02/01/thoughts-on-search-quality.aspx</a></a><br><br>Why they've got away without being prosecuted for misusing customer data I don't know. The privacy statement makes it clear they will strip private data from that, and we know search terms are private data, so it should have been stripped.
        guihombre
      • RE: Bing continues to slowly gain search market share while Google sees a drop

        @prof123
        Do you have proof for it? I accept anything other than Google's rant.
        Ram U
      • RE: Bing continues to slowly gain search market share while Google sees a drop

        @Rama.NET
        That blog I quoted is *bing* not *Google* blog, and his statement confirms it:

        "A small piece of that is clickstream data we get from some of our customers, who opt-in to sharing anonymous data as they navigate the web in order to help us improve the experience for all users. "

        And the AOL scandal which showed that search results are not anonymous:
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AOL_search_data_scandal
        guihombre
      • What a bunch of crybabaies

        @prof123 <br>Deal with it.<br>"People aren't using my precious Google!? Oh, the pain, THE PAIN!"
        Will Farrell
      • @What a bunch of crybabaies

        @Will Farrell,
        Although you may see this solely in terms of Google, it makes little difference whether Bing is copying Ask's searches or Google's.

        It's using the private search data, done on another site, *without* their consent, and I do say *without* because their claimed consent is for anonymous data and search data is not anonymous.

        Thus there is a serious problem there, that no amount of misdirections and non-denials mitigates.
        guihombre
      • Bing continues to slowly gain search market share while Google sees a drop

        @guihombre Anonymous data is that data which cannot be used to trace back to the user/computer. If there is any proof that search terms are accompanied with traceable data like IP address, MAC address, username, machine name etc. please provide it so that everyone can see.
        1773
      • RE: Bing continues to slowly gain search market share while Google sees a drop

        @guihombre
        Thanks for the links. Sure I am going to bookmark those.
        Ram U
  • competition?

    so you like competition? seems like google has had a lot of competition: msn search, live search, whatever ms has called which they're now calling bing, alta vista, yahoo, aol, ask...

    and it won fair and square. people chose to use it.

    so tell me, since microsoft is willing to lose unimaginable fortunes to "compete" how is that competition? is it competition if you can never lose? if the others had billions to lose to stay "competitive" then i'm sure they'd be growing too. but they have that pesky little thing called a bottom line. microsoft has the cash cow twins.

    you call that competition? it's buying their way into a market. there is nothing competitive about it. they lost they just won't go home.

    as ballmer said, ms may not be the first or the best but they just keep coming and coming and coming.

    translation: they'll pump money into it until the "competition" dies.
    sportmac
    • Ha.

      @sportmac You say that as if Google doesn't have infinitely deep pockets as well. You're right, Google won fair and square and that was even with Microsoft pumping as much money into search as they were back then (a lot). So, that point is moot. And these days, companies have proven time-and-time again that successful marketing doesn't require fat pockets. That's the power of the ubiquity of the Web -- especially now that it's bleeding into the television market much more these days.<br><br>I love using Google, personally. I use it more than Bing. But I *do* use Bing for searches Google just doesn't cut it with for me. Sorry, but I don't think anyone's buying the "Microsoft has deep pockets" argument in the search arena anymore -- especially not against Google. And buying one's way into a market is how PLENTY of people have to do things. What do you think you're seeing when you see ads in Google searches? The one with the most open wallet gets the highest-placed ad for keywords they bid on. SEO can combat that which *can* be costly, but it can be MUCH cheaper than emptying one's wallet for ads. And even if the ads do achieve the highest placement, people still have to try/review your product. If it's useless, guess what happens? They move right along to the next.<br><br>Welcome to 2011. You should learn a thing or two about marketing today.<br><br>-Stephen
      StephenChapman
      • really

        @StephenChapman
        and that 700 mil microsoft lost last year on bing? how does that fit into your "no deep pockets" argument? name another company, one will do nicely, that can lose that kind of money and stay in the game. and it's "moot" because... why? that money they're losing is somehow less relevant today than it was yesterday?

        in fact, look at the over a decade history of msn, msn search, hotmail, etc. and microsoft has never made a single nickel from it. ever. that's competition?

        buying one's way into a market usually consists of r&d and product deployment and hoping you get a return on it. if not it usually disappears from the shelf. it is not pumping fortunes into it year after year after year until the competition gives up.

        hey, thanks for the marketing lesson but unless you have a degree in marketing giving advice like that is, well, i'm sure you know.
        sportmac
      • Google has made enough money off of search that they can afford to match

        Microsoft on spending and then some. The big difference is that Microsoft was only able to compete by pouring in billions of dollars from their monopoly businesses. That said, competition in any form is great, and Microsoft's investments here have forced Google to innovate faster and pour more money back into making search better. All great for consumers.
        DonnieBoy
      • btw

        @StephenChapman <br>those ads in google searches? you think a company will keep buying them if they lost a lot of money? billions? i'm sure you've already thought of that though, marketing in 2011 and all.
        sportmac
      • RE: Bing continues to slowly gain search market share while Google sees a drop

        @sportmac The takeaway from my point is, despite the amount of money Microsoft has been pumping into its Internet-based endeavors, Google has CONSISTENTLY beaten the pants off of them. Now, with Bing, Microsoft has a product that people are trying and enjoying. Microsoft is working against much more than simply competing with Google; they're working against people like YOU who hate a product and exercise the ignorant bliss of blind brand loyalty.

        Yes, Microsoft has deep pockets. So does Google. If you want another company with that kind of money who could stay in the game, try Facebook who is known to be working on a search platform. Likewise, rumors of Apple getting in the search game would introduce yet another company with that kind of budget. There, I gave you two. Happy?

        Right now, the search market is wholly dominated by Google and Microsoft -- Google, much more so. History has shown, as you've pointed out, that Microsoft has tossed exorbitant amounts of money at search. No one's arguing that. But where has that gotten them? You correlate their gain in market share with their perpetual flow of cash, but you really have no clue what the gain can be attributed to. From what you're presenting, it's solely a matter of how much money someone has to throw at something. That's an old belief no longer applicable today. Sure, it works, but it's not the sole dominating factor like it used to be. If it were, Google's making such a ridiculous amount of money from their ad-based model that they could easily *QUADRUPLE* how much Microsoft puts into search marketing and just be done with it!

        Clearly, no matter how much money Microsoft allocates towards Bing's marketing, the competition isn't giving up. Heck, the competition isn't even CLOSE. At the end of the day, it's about what people *WANT* to use. And the numbers are showing that people *WANT* to use Bing just a little bit more right now. If you choose to believe that has everything to do with the amount of money Microsoft has put into search, so be it -- I'm not going to try to convince you otherwise. I won't deny that Microsoft putting that much money towards it hasn't done something for it, but if you want to question competition, go look at everyone breathing down Google's neck for what they view as unfair advantages.

        And one doesn't need a marketing degree these days to have a sound opinion of marketing. I didn't get a job writing for ZDNet about SEO and Internet marketing-related endeavors because I'm clueless, you know.

        -Stephen
        StephenChapman
      • sportmac: All I can say is that it is good that Google can match Microsoft

        on spending so that there is competition. The amount of money that Microsoft is pouring into search in an effort to destroy Google is simply amazing, and shows how good Google is in order to be able to survive against that. What other competitor could survive, let along thrive like Google is, with a competitor willing to throw billions of dollars at destroying you?
        DonnieBoy
      • BTW

        @sportmac You would be surprised how much money companies spend to put their product at the top of the search engine. It's not about who can spend billions, it's about who can spend what they can spend in their market. Companies all over the world in markets and niches of varying types spend exorbitant amounts of money to market their product year-after-year.

        Search is an insanely lucrative market, as Google has proven. Insanely lucrative markets warrant exorbitant amounts of money spent by companies who can afford the high risk. You seem to think Microsoft is the only company in the world who does that.

        -Stephen
        StephenChapman