Joe McKendrick

Joe McKendrick is an author, consultant and speaker specializing in trends and developments shaping the technology industry.

Latest Posts

Web services keep on truckin'

Real-life, large-scale working examples of Web services/SOA are few and far between, so I was pleased to have the opportunity to chat with Jerry Hilt, systems analyst with Con-Way Transportation, a $2 billion distribution services company (you can see their trucks on most main highways across North America). Con-Way has been evolving an SOA infrastructure for several years now, enabling its seven separate business units to share standardized customer-facing applications.

December 14, 2004 by

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WSDM: Not-so-conventional wisdom

For you standards aficionados out there -- and you know who you are -- there's another spec now out for public review. The OASIS Technical Committee that oversees development of the Web Services Distributed Management, or WSDM (pronounced "Wisdom") specification, will be accepting comments through January 10, 2005.

December 14, 2004 by

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Kernel knowledge

In a recent post, Avanade's Steve Maine parses a presentation by Microsoft's Don Box, and does a great job of explaining the essential core elements of a Web service, which he calls the Web service "kernel." The kernel in an operating system consists of the important stuff you dont need to know too much about, as Maine puts it.

December 14, 2004 by

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Security outside the box

In my previous post, I observed that disruptive Web services standardization will create many consolidations and mergers within the IT industry. Simultaneously, new markets are also springing up.

December 13, 2004 by

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Last mile

The most challenging aspect of service-oriented architecture is the final connection to existing applications and systems. Exposing your enterprise systems and managing the necessary linkages has been dubbed "the last mile problem" by software integration specialist David Linthicum.

December 13, 2004 by Britton Manasco

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Grid-like and gridlock

Software and computing cyles are moving onparallel tracks toward a destination we call "service-oriented IT."We tend to refer to many service-focused, software advancements as "Web services," while many are now referring to on-demand, data processing services as "grid computing.

December 13, 2004 by Britton Manasco

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The shape of things to come

As Britton observes, Oracle's $10 billion absorption of PeopleSoft will mean more acceleration of integration efforts between various potential "killer apps" (sorry, Britton, couldn't resist) within the budding Web services and SOA space. The acquisition is also is proof of an immutable law of business: when two or more vendors begin to offer identical products or services, consolidation becomes inevitable.

December 12, 2004 by

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Hello Larry

PeopleSoft's agreement to be acquired by Oracle for $10.3 billion may add a bit more momentum to theservice-oriented business application arena.

December 12, 2004 by Britton Manasco

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The horizontal economy

In the late 1930s, economist Ronald Coase (later to win the Nobel prize) wrote an influential paper examining why firms tend to keep some activities in-house, yet rely on an open market of suppliers and partners for other things. Coase learned that "transaction costs" -- the costs associated with coordinating and collaborating with outside firms -- often were just too high.

December 9, 2004 by Britton Manasco

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