Joe McKendrick

Joe McKendrick is an author and independent analyst who tracks the impact of information technology on management and markets. Joe is co-author, along with 16 leading industry leaders and thinkers, of the SOA Manifesto, which outlines the values and guiding principles of service orientation. He speaks frequently on cloud, data, and enterprise computing topics at industry events and Webcasts. As an independent analyst, he has authored numerous research reports in partnership with Forbes Insights and Unisphere Research, a division of Information Today, Inc. In a previous life, Joe served as director of the Administrative Management Society (AMS), an international professional association dedicated to advancing knowledge within the IT and business management fields. He is a graduate of Temple University.

Latest Posts

A 'service-oriented architecture' for data makes sense

A 'service-oriented architecture' for data makes sense

How about a "service oriented architecture" for data? Over at the Informatica Perspectives blogsite, I quoted from a presentation given by Madan Sheina, principal analyst within Ovum's Software Applications group, who proposed that a data architecture be designed along the same lines as SOA for applications - in what he calls "process-driven data integration.

February 3, 2009 by in Developer

Another vote for 'shovel-ready' SOA

Another vote for 'shovel-ready' SOA

Jason English picked up on my "Shovel-Ready SOA" proposal, noting that SOA has moved beyond theory and can be considered to be in the thick of the roll-up-our-sleeves-and-get-it-done stage. He agrees that this may be a great "stimulus package" for revitalizing the infrastructure of beleaguered businesses:"In tough times, nothing boosts your chances to survive, and be positioned to thrive, like enhanced confidence, collaboration, and agility through SOA efforts.

February 3, 2009 by in Enterprise Software

Soft talk: What is service oriented communications, and why will it matter?

Soft talk: What is service oriented communications, and why will it matter?

Can we build our phone systems as standardized applications or services that will easily plug into the rest of our IT infrastructures?That's the promise of service oriented communications, which could convert communications and communications channels (voice, text, conference calls, email, IM) into software, so we can better integrate it into everything else we're doing.

February 2, 2009 by in Enterprise Software

Shovel-ready SOA

Shovel-ready SOA

One the goals of the current economic stimulus plan being prepped in Washington is that it will funnel money into infrastructure projects that will ostensibly be "shovel-ready," meaning they are ready to go and could possibly lead to new waves of hiring.Perhaps we should look at service orienting as a shovel-ready "stimulus" program for corporate growth.

January 28, 2009 by in Enterprise Software

In defense of SOA standards bodies

In defense of SOA standards bodies

Duane Nickull, who is very active in the SOA and Web services standards space, was incensed by an anonymous blog posting that savages the efforts of standards bodies, and has published a rebuttal defending the work of these groups.Since the offending post was anonymous and has the look and smell of an aggregator site, I won't dignify it with a link.

January 26, 2009 by in Enterprise Software

SOA repositories pave the way for financial mergers

SOA repositories pave the way for financial mergers

We've been speculating that SOA and integration proponents would be kept very busy with all the shotgun weddings and all other manner of turmoil going on within the financial services sector.  ZDNet colleague Dana Gardner has just released a discussion with Harry Karr and Hemesh Yadav, IT architects at Wachovia, who talk about integration challenges as their organization gets absorbed into Wells Fargo.

January 22, 2009 by in Developer

Time for SOA 'Outliers' to reshape service orientation?

Time for SOA 'Outliers' to reshape service orientation?

I've been reading Malcolm Gladwell's latest work, Outliers, which is packed full of interesting observations about people who rose above the rest and achieved incredible success in their respective endeavors.An interesting point Gladwell makes is that all people successful in their respective fields all have one thing -- just one thing -- in common: they have spent at least 10,000 hours learning and internalizing and perfecting their crafts.

January 19, 2009 by in Enterprise Software

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