All-in-one desktops court small-biz need for space, efficiency

All-in-one desktops court small-biz need for space, efficiency

Summary: It used to be that notebook design was inspired by desktop systems innovation. Now, however, that equation has been reversed.

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TOPICS: Hardware
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It used to be that notebook design was inspired by desktop systems innovation. Now, however, that equation has been reversed.

The evidence comes in the form of an ever-growing crop of all-in-one desktop options, many of them entirely and especially appropriate for use by small businesses seeking to make the most of limited space and electricity resources. The rallying cry is thinner, more energy-efficient, more multimedia-savvy. And, of course, more touch-sensitive.

Among the latest batch of models fitting into this category is the very first all-in-one touchscreen desktop for the North America from smartphone leader Samsung (pictured below).

Consult this ZDNet Photo Gallery, "9 small-biz-appropriate touchscreen all-in-ones," for more details on the Samsung product and eight other new-ish all-in-one systems that have a touchscreen interface and that can be had for less than $1,000.

Topic: Hardware

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  • Save the planet: put your monitor in a landfill?

    We just had a Sony Vaio desktop die after several years of use, and we ended up replacing it with an HP because the only desktops Sony sells anymore are all-in-ones. We don't need a new monitor and didn't want to pay for a new monitor.
    Robert Hahn
  • RE: All-in-one desktops court small-biz need for space, efficiency

    All-in-One desktops are expensive to buy, cost more to repair, modify, or up-grade. A retail environment needs the ability to function in a pinch with no web access, as in service customers during power outages, and these times can also be used to catch up on bookkeeping, inventory, and some system maintenance. Each computer should be able to handle all functions in that location, synchronised to all others when connections resume. A standard desktop, with added hard-drives, can do nicely. An even greater savings can be realised running Ubuntu or similar Linux OS, due to no software costs, ability to use older printer, scanner, etc., and requires less processor/memory. Such machines tend to use less electricity, and produce less heat than with Windows OS, also important when running on back-up power. During a blizzard or hurricane people need stuff and we must be able to sell, at least cash, check, or open accounts. And customers will remember that we were there in a pinch while our competitors were not.
    olddogv