Visual Studio 2008 coming next week

Visual Studio 2008 coming next week

Summary: The MSDN Subscriptions Weblog is telling us that Visual Studio 2008 will be available to subscribers early next week. Darryl Taft of eWeek has some additional information about the VS 2008 release with a supposed date of November 19th.

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Visual Studio 2008 coming next weekThe MSDN Subscriptions Weblog is telling us that Visual Studio 2008 will be available to subscribers early next week. Darryl Taft of eWeek has some additional information about the VS 2008 release with a supposed date of November 19th.

Visual Studio 2008 has a number of features that will be beneficial for RIA developers on the Microsoft platform. First and foremost, Visual Studio 2008 has full support for creating WPF applications for Vista and XP. Visual Studio 2008 adds support for editing XAML and enhances the designer/developer workflow between VS and Blend. Perhaps more importantly is the support for Silverlight in Visual Studio 2008. The Silverlight tools are available as an add-on for Visual Studio 2008. It won't be built into VS 2008 presumably because the tools will change when Silverlight 1.1 is released (I'm taking bets that it will actually be called Silverlight 2.0).

By most accounts, Visual Studio 2008 is an impressive IDE. It builds off of the strengths of Visual Studio 2005 and adds support for the next generation of the platform. The bulk of that next generation consists of RIA technologies. In some ways, this is the first RIA editor for the Microsoft platform.

Topics: Software Development, Microsoft

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3 comments
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  • Awesome!

    Christmas will be arriving early for me this year! The second beta release was pretty good, higher quality than beta 2 for VS 2005, so I'm anticipating a blockbuster RTM release this time around as well! Thanks Microsoft!
    Tiggster
    • Comments.

      As already noted, I'm a happy VS2008 Beta 2 user. As the RTM was expected in Februrary, this release next week is an extremely pleasant surprise.

      A vast amount of development is done in .Net, probably about the same about as in Java. A difference between .Net and Java is that most .Net developers are using Visual Studio, whereas in Java its more fragmented. This means that whatever Microsoft roll into Visual Studio, tends to get broadly adopted very quickly.

      Remember also that a very significant proportion of these developers are on an MSDN subscription, and will get VS2k8 "for free", and because Microsoft allows this version to target .Net 2.0, 3.0, and 3.5, surely many will adopt this as their IDE, even if their projects are remain at .Net 2.0.

      Another nice move from Microsof, the C# 3.0 compiler (supporting LINQ and lots of other new stuff) is compatible with the 2.0 runtime, again encouraging early use of VS2k8.

      Anyway I think by removing barriers to developers immediately using this version, the knock on will be a big increase in the use of WPF and Silverlight. I think WPF is fantastic (but not without its problems).

      Silverlight 1.0 is not so interesting to me - I want the CLR behind before I start to use it (reason: I dont want to code in JavaScript). I bet that's a common opinion too, and I dont really expect to see much usage of Silverlight before 1.1.

      The current 1.1 betas are really too far short of the RTM to be that interesting to try and work with.

      Incidently, WCF will also be a great asset when building RIAs. It WS-* compliant, and .Net 3.5 adds support for new protocols, and well as support for REST services. Any useful RIA toolset has to include excellent comms, and WCF has that excellence.
      TheTruthisOutThere@...
  • VS 2008 Isolated Shell

    For me one of the most exciting things, about Visual Studio 2008, is the Isolated Shell. Microsoft has started thinking a little more like a platform vendor instead of a software vendor (eating your own young was never a good business model). I am heartened by many of their recent moves.
    craig@...