WPF and Apple's Core Animation - A resurgence of the desktop experience

WPF and Apple's Core Animation - A resurgence of the desktop experience

Summary: Julian pointed me to a very interesting article by Kevin Hoffman over at the .NET Developers Journal about Mac OS X Leopard. Kevin looks like he's a pretty hard core .NET guy who has been able to get a look at Leopard. He compares it to Windows Presentation Foundation which got me thinking about how much excitement there is around developing for the desktop.

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TOPICS: Apple
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Core Animation LogoJulesLt pointed me to a very interesting article by Kevin Hoffman over at the .NET Developers Journal about Mac OS X Leopard. Kevin looks like he's a pretty hard core .NET guy who has been able to get a look at Leopard. From his article:

What really blew my mind was Core Animation, Quartz Composer, Core Image, and Cocoa's integration of Core Animation (all of this is public info, please don't shoot me Apple!). As a .NET developer, I couldn't help but mentally compare that suite of APIs and functionality with Microsoft's Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF). I'll save the item-by-item comparison for when Leopard becomes public and I can get into nitty-gritty detail.

I can't wait to see what he has to say when everything is released. I talked a bit about Core Animation and Quicktime last year and since then have realized that my assumptions were off base. But there does seem to be a renewed interest in desktop development, and I'm not entirely sure why.

I think mainly it is due to the fact that experience is becoming VERY important, and for experience, nothing is as rich as the desktop. I think that means Apollo is coming in at the perfect time and with a perfect set of features. I also think it means that web developers are going to have the "experience ante" upped on them and they will need to compete by finding richer platforms for their applications. Flash is positionedpositionted to become even more used in the web applicaton space than it is now (especially as Flex grows) and "WPF/E" could come to the market just as the need is rising.

Topic: Apple

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  • A little biased aren't we?

    "I think that means Apollo is coming in at the perfect time and with a perfect set of features."

    Wow, "perfect" is a strong word you must really like it.

    However, I still don't see how that is generally true. The technology seems sound but can Adobe execute on the vision to create great tools and developer experiences.

    Flash and Flex are good technologies but why have I not seen them taken up by large numbers of developers or companies for rich desktop applications after how many years?

    So how does Apollo change this?

    Why should I consider Apollo over java or .Net & WPF?
    MarlonSmith
    • RE: A little biased aren't we?

      Hey Marlon, I think the two big things Apollo brings to the table are that it's cross-platform and that it relies on web technologies like HTML, Flash and PDF that people are familiar with developing for.

      I love the things I've seen done in WPF. I went down to the North Face store here in Seattle this week because they have a WPF app running on their kiosks and it was very well done.

      To answer the question about Flash/Flex adoption, prior to Flex 2, Flex was just too damn expensive and Flash was hard to build anything with. Now that Flex 2 is much cheaper (and doesn't require a server) adoption is increasing.

      Thanks for commenting!
      ryanstewart