Robin Harris

Harris has been working with computers for over 35 years and selling and marketing data storage for over 30 in companies large and small. He introduced a couple of multi-billion dollar storage products (DLT, the first Fibre Channel array) to market, as well as a many smaller ones. Earlier he spent 10 years marketing servers and networks. After leaving corporate life he founded TechnoQWAN, a consulting and analyst firm. He also developed StorageMojo into one of the top storage industry blogs. Robin writes, consults, coaches and lives in Sedona, Arizona.

Ricardo Bilton

Ricardo Bilton writes for ZDNet's The ToyBox.

Latest Posts

Data corruption is worse than you know

Data corruption is worse than you know

Many people reacted with disbelief to my recent series on data corruption (see How data gets lost, 50 ways to lose your data and How Microsoft puts your data at risk), claiming it had never happened to them. Really?

published September 17, 2007 by

Comments

Build a $2,500 supercomputer

Build a $2,500 supercomputer

Supercomputing Costco-styleIn 1997, IBM's Deep Blue supercomputer beat world chess champion Gary Kasparov. Today you can build a more powerful machine for less than $2,500 in an 11" x 12" x 17" box.

published August 31, 2007 by

Comments

Seagate's visible firmware problem

Seagate's visible firmware problem

A recent problem with the firmware in a Seagate drive offers a peek at the 400,000 lines of spaghetti code inside a modern disk. It is a cautionary tale for those who blithely assume that disk drives "just work.

published August 29, 2007 by

Comments

Can Apple's new Pages replace Word?

Can Apple's new Pages replace Word?

Storing data in documentsI ordered Apple's new iWork '08 package Tuesday and it arrived two days later. I've had the prior iWork suites but found little use for them as Microsoft's Office suite - which I've used for 15 years - met my needs without a learning curve.

published August 14, 2007 by

Comments

How data gets lost

How data gets lost

Our perception of risk and the reality of risk are often two different things. For example, are computer viruses or system glitches more likely to hose your data?

published August 6, 2007 by

Comments

The best of ZDNet, delivered

You have been successfully signed up. To sign up for more newsletters or to manage your account, visit the Newsletter Subscription Center.
Subscription failed.

Top Stories