Robin Harris

Robin Harris is Chief Analyst at TechnoQWAN LLC, a storage research and consulting firm he founded in 2005. Based in Sedona, Arizona, TechnoQWAN focuses on emerging technologies, products, companies and markets. Robin has over 35 years experience in the IT industry and earned degrees from Yale and the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School.

Ricardo Bilton

Ricardo Bilton writes for ZDNet's The ToyBox.

Latest Posts

100,000 year nanowire storage

100,000 year nanowire storage

For all the technology we use to store data, there is one problem that has no good solution: longevity. Some scientists at the University of Pennsylvania - home of some of the first computers - have developed a new kind of memory that is 1,000x faster than flash and should hold its contents for 100,000 years.

published October 2, 2007 by

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Engineering the 10 TB notebook drive

Engineering the 10 TB notebook drive

We all take it for granted that disk capacities keep rising, but did you ever wonder why?Disks are way more complex than you knowChips have a lot of brilliant technology, but disk drives are just as complex.

published September 27, 2007 by

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Will flash EVER replace disk?

Will flash EVER replace disk?

How about never - is never good for you?As a long-time fan of flash (NAND) storage - and a flash notebook long-ago user - I've been repeatedly surprised at how the hype for flash drives and the reality have diverged (see Hybrid drives: not so fast, Flash drives: your mileage WILL vary, and Power, notebooks and solid state disk).

published September 20, 2007 by

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Data corruption is worse than you know

Data corruption is worse than you know

Many people reacted with disbelief to my recent series on data corruption (see How data gets lost, 50 ways to lose your data and How Microsoft puts your data at risk), claiming it had never happened to them. Really?

published September 17, 2007 by

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Build a $2,500 supercomputer

Build a $2,500 supercomputer

Supercomputing Costco-styleIn 1997, IBM's Deep Blue supercomputer beat world chess champion Gary Kasparov. Today you can build a more powerful machine for less than $2,500 in an 11" x 12" x 17" box.

published August 31, 2007 by

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Seagate's visible firmware problem

Seagate's visible firmware problem

A recent problem with the firmware in a Seagate drive offers a peek at the 400,000 lines of spaghetti code inside a modern disk. It is a cautionary tale for those who blithely assume that disk drives "just work.

published August 29, 2007 by

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