James Farrar

James has more than 15 years of experience working on corporate sustainability issues from both the corporate and NGO campaigning perspective.

Latest Posts

Unwatchable: dial R for rape. How much does your handset really cost?

Unwatchable is a graphic new film highlighting sexual violence in the Democratic Republic of Congo as a tactic in the control of minerals used for electronics manufacturing. It's part of a campaign asking UK consumers to demand manufacturers control their supply chains and that governments introduce legislation to control the trade.

September 28, 2011 by James Farrar

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Leo Apotheker's HP legacy: a global vision

As Leo Apotheker departs HP, perhaps his lasting legacy is to give HP a truly global vision and a strategy of capturing the markets, rather than just the corporate treasury, to drive sustainable development.

September 23, 2011 by James Farrar

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Salesforce and Google: rising stars in S&P 500 Carbon Survey

The Carbon Disclosure Project S&P 500 survey results are released on Tuesday and while Cisco leads the real story is Google and Salesforce's rapid climb up the rankings. Yahoo! trails at the back of the pack, HP out performs Dell and Apple just ignores the whole thing.

September 19, 2011 by James Farrar

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Salesforce keeps on rockin in the free world

At Dreamforce 2011 Marc Benioff rolled out an exciting prospect for a social 'corporate spring'. But what is a truly social enterprise and is Salesforce itself one? Can citizens and companies tap into the power of social to overcome the resistance of incumbency?

September 13, 2011 by James Farrar

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Integrated Reporting: can it solve the sustainability information gap?

Integrated Reporting is the latest buzzword for financial, non financial and sustainability reporting. Now the International Integrated Reporting Committee has published a framework for integrated reporting. The new model puts the CFO squarely in charge which brings benefits of more robust & reliable reporting but the old problems of strategy and process don't yet just disappear.

September 11, 2011 by James Farrar

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