Chair ball at HP

Chair ball at HP

Summary: My experience with corporate boards and strategy always reminds me of Dave Barry's depiction of the journalist staff at the Miami Herald: a bunch of childish guys zooming around the board room on roller chairs trying to dunk a wad of paper in the trash can.  Boards and executives are just like the rest of us.

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TOPICS: Hewlett-Packard
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My experience with corporate boards and strategy always reminds me of Dave Barry's depiction of the journalist staff at the Miami Herald: a bunch of childish guys zooming around the board room on roller chairs trying to dunk a wad of paper in the trash can.  Boards and executives are just like the rest of us. They are making things up as they go along. In the case of the latest debacle in HP's board room the Chairman and maybe even the CEO, and certainly the legal staff of HP, were incensed at the leaking of information by a director and hired Private Investigators to figure out who it was. The PI's used pretexting (lying) to get phone records. 

A question.  Why is anyone upset by this?  After all, only if you had something to hide should you be worried about someone knowing your phone calls.  (In case you don't know me this is a completely facetious question.)

And, I cannot help but think about the Israeli Trojan incident of over a year ago. It that case it appears that the Haephrati's were incarcerated and only now are the PIs being tried. But what about the executives of the dozens of organizations that hired the PIs to use Trojan horse malware to steal competitor's information?  When are they going to be tried?   

Oh, yes. A quick suggestion for the board members of HP.  Have you received any suspicious emails from HP lately? Ones with Trojan horses attached to them perhaps?  

 

Topic: Hewlett-Packard

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  • Foolish notion

    Richard Stiennon, et. al. who beleive that there isn't any reason for someone to be upset over someone digging through your phone records obviously have never lived in a goldfish bowl.

    These fat heads have no concept of the pressure of always being watched, scrutinized, and analyzed. The slightest deviation from your normal routine and they come down on you to make you justify your actions, no matter how innocent or necessary they may have been.

    Just because the actions of someone aren't illegal, immoral, or unethical still doesn't mean that they might not be embarassing or damaging if revealed. Want your jealous wife to know you called a female coworker to arrange for a dinner the other night? All you discussed was work, but do you want to spend the next week trying to prove it to your suspicious spouse?

    You want to dig through my records? Fine, I expect to be paid for it. After all, it was my actions that caused them to be generated in the first place and I ought to be paid for my work.
    Dr_Zinj