ADARA Networks - is it bigger than a breadbox?

ADARA Networks - is it bigger than a breadbox?

Summary: ADARA Networks appears to be doing its best to do just about everything for everyone, everywhere, always. While an interesting concept, I have to wonder about a company trying to have such a broad reach.

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TOPICS: Processors
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Every now and again, I'm approached by a company offering a product or a service that I can't quite get my arms around. This is one of the reasons that I use the Kusnetzky Group model as a tool to determine what market(s) the company is addressing, who its competitors are and what market opportunities it faces. The company is question this time is ADARA Networks.

ADARA networks has developed something it is calling a "Full Stack Network." I asked Eric Johnson, ADARA Networks CEO, to help me place what the company is doing into the categories in the model. Here is his response:

Access virtualization—Allows access to any application from any device

ADARA is specifically designed as the premier platform for the interconnection of clients to servers, applications and services. Because ADARA’s Constellation Full Stack Engine contains every major appliance (load balancers, WAN accelerators, routers, switches, DNS servers, etc.) acting in a constantly optimizing manner, every capability needed to interconnect clients to services is contained on the platform and operated in a coordinated manner. Access to any service from any device is both assured, secured, and optimized for the method of access, for the client and the service.

Application virtualization—Enables applications to run on many different operating systems and hardware platforms

ADARA is an x86 platform, with native support for ATOM, ARM and any general purpose processing system, with MIPS and optimized x86 support. ADARA enables the network to become an execution platform, so applications can be executed anywhere, virtual computing via Virtual Machine migration, application migration, state migration and application execution virtualization are all supported in conjunction with network and client virtualization.

Processing virtualization—Makes one system seem like many, or many seem like one

ADARA enables the data center (compute or execution environment ) as well as the network to become an execution platform, so applications can be executed anywhere, virtual computing via Virtual Machine migration, application migration, state migration and application execution virtualization are all supported in conjunction with network and client virtualization, and supports protocol transformation, virtual switching, virtual routing and any and all levels of virtualization in processing or transport.

Network virtualization—Presents an artificial view of the network that differs from the physical reality

ADARA natively supports all levels of network virtualization at the flow, path, interface, route, domain Intra- and Inter-Domain levels, VLAN scaling 224, 236, (scaling from 4096 VLANs to nearly 17MM and 68 B VLANs later this year) and multiple administrative domain and control plane abstraction via OpenFlow and non-OpenFlow enabled infrastructure.

Storage virtualization—Allows many systems to share the same storage devices, enables concealing the location of storage systems, and more

ADARA Object virtualization enables us to federate and virtualize all contents of all servers and storage systems including federated data dictionaries used in WAN acceleration

Analysis

ADARA Networks appears to be doing its best to do just about everything for everyone, everywhere, always. While an interesting concept, I have to wonder about a company trying to have such a broad reach.

While the "do everything" products offer the advantage of being highly integrated, I can't help but wonder if each of the functions will live up to market expectations or to the capabilities of competitive products.

I also wonder if customers will feel comfortable with a single company, a new one at that, controlling so much of their software stack.

It is an interesting concept and I wish them well.

Topic: Processors

About

Daniel Kusnetzky, a reformed software engineer and product manager, founded Kusnetzky Group LLC in 2006. He's literally written the book on virtualization and often comments on cloud computing, mobility and systems software. In his spare time, he's also the managing partner of Lux Sonus LLC, an investment firm.

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4 comments
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  • Adara

    You sound skeptical but give no other reasons than co.'s broad reach. No thoughts or analysis on the products and their efficacy, commercial appeal, etc.?
    Blue5100
  • Yes - I wish them well too.

    If the Adara technology does what they state it does, then the reach is not too broad. It's rather like a world where everyone is using rotary dial analog phones, and these guys show up with an iPhone. Verizon and HP have given Adara a thumbs up, and that's a solid start. Let's hope so. It's time for a quantum leap in network management and interoperability.
    IBM Vet
  • The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly -wish them well too but not in Disneyworld.

    The Good: Been there, saw the lab, witnessed their QA, Developers, SE, and etc..

    The Bad: Eric Johnson is one of the greatest conman... cough cough (I mean salesman in the world!)

    The Ugly: They only have the 11 HP DL360 G5 routers to impress potential buyers; and they must be rebooted before the demo for somewhat working at layer 3. The rest of the demo???? How about playing Pacman or Space Invaders?

    (BONUS: Employees who are and were not in Eric circle of power will sometime have to work on the weekends or even holidays and may encounter the college-all-night-puller. Employees are never expected to have a family but 100% company dedications for the grunts not in the circle of influence.)
    anonymous99
  • God Box

    If the Adara product seems to be the "God box" to do everything, it is also based on technologies that appear to be more slideware than anything else.

    I would concur with the person who said those not in the "inner circle" are more or less treated to working in a high-tech sweatshop.

    I would add that there are a lot of H1B engineers there, because they can't leave.
    Russian55