Oracle: Our full virtualization stack beats VMware

Oracle: Our full virtualization stack beats VMware

Summary: Oracle took a pre-emptive strike at VMware this week, maintaining that its integrated and expansive virtualization portfolio is far superior to the "point" solution offered by the No 1 virtualization company.Oracle -- which claims to provide full stack support for virtualization from application to disk, and for cloud computing needs  --  detailed its strategy just weeks before VMware's annual VMworld conference.

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Oracle took a pre-emptive strike at VMware this week, maintaining that its integrated and expansive virtualization portfolio is far superior to the "point" solution offered by the No 1 virtualization company.

Oracle -- which claims to provide full stack support for virtualization from application to disk, and for cloud computing needs  --  detailed its strategy just weeks before VMware's annual VMworld conference.

Edward Screven, chief corporate architect at Oracle, said most customers won't deploy mission critical applications in a virtualized environment today because vendors do not deliver the same level of high availabiluty and scalability offered in non virtualized infrastructures.

Oracle will change that, he said.

"The data center is moving away from [being]a fixed installation to a service center," and line-of-business executives expect the same services provided by third party cloud providers, such as capacity on demand, rapid application development and reduced management costs, he said.

"There's an evolution happening in requirements and with the demands placed on virtualization technology... isolated virtualization solutions are not enough," Screven said. "The goal is to deploy a full stack and be able to change the level of compute power applied to the stack dynamically .. [without] making management harder."

Viortualization is not a feature but a core technology that is integrated and supported throughout Oracle's server, desktop, middleware and storage stack, he noted

The lineup includes Oracle VM Server for x86 and Solaris [as well as Sun Containers and Dynamic Domains], Oracle VM Manager and Oracle VMTemplates, which allow customers to rapidly deploy pre-installed and pre-configured appliances in no time.

Additionally, Oracle recently announced four desktop virtualization options, including Oracle Virtual Desktop Infrastructure 3.2, Oracle Sun Ray Software 5, Oracle VM Virtual Box 3.2 and Sun Ray 3 Plus Client.

On the middleware side, Oracle recently introduced its Oracle Weblogic Suite Virtualization Option, which combines the WebLogic  server and Oracle's JRockit Virtual Edition. The solution eliminates the need for a guest operating system and thus provides a fast runtime for virtualized environments. The related Virtual Assembly Builder assists in the deployment process, Oracle noted.

Executives also said that its Blade engineering group has worked to improve storage/networking connections to virtualized assets. Oracle, for instance, developed a new chip so that each blade has access to a 10gbit network interface without a switch that provide mac addresses to all virtual machines.

Oracle's virtualization technology use networing interfaces and allows customers to deploy VMs without uplinks and use template tools to rapidly deploy virtual images. This reduces networking complexity and cost and achieves a high performance of application deployment.

"There no other company that can offer the same breadth and depth of virtualization technology and [other] unique capabilities only an application provider can bring, said John Fowler, Oracle's executive vice president of systems.

Oracle's argument is persuasive and should convince many of its existing customers that it can handle their emerging infrastructure-as-a-service needs.

The products detailed are available now but Oracle still has to prove to the masses that it is as adept at virtualization management and cloud computing as established vendors such as VMware -- and that costs to deliver on this marketecture aren't prohibitive.

Time will tell, but Oracle's timing could not be better.

Topics: CXO, Cloud, Hardware, Oracle, Storage, Virtualization, VMware

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27 comments
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  • Hey, no virtualization beats them all

    (flashback to 1977) Chrysler exec: Hey those government regulations are a bear! Our new emission controls reduce our Charger (318) V8 to 140 horsepower (true story). Ford exec: You guys s*ck! Our V8 puts out 150 hp! Guy at home: Well I removed all that crap and get 200 hp.

    Do I need to connect that analogy for you?
    Roger Ramjet
    • Yes please!

      @Roger Ramjet

      Are you saying that Virtualisation or Cloud Computing is of no use?

      I can't comment on the latter, but the former has it's place & is damn good! Especially for Desktop Visualization in Satellite offices.
      DevJonny
      • Virtualization has its place

        @DevJonny to create DEV environments on the fly. Everything else is a conditioned response . . .
        Roger Ramjet
      • more than just Dev

        @Roger Ramjet<br><br>i very frequently use virtualization clusters in places where direct physical installs simply could not manage the uptime requirements<br><br>i also have to deal with a limited budget. were my budget unlimited, i probably would stay with direct physical installs, but i would also have 4-6 times the current number of physical hosts.<br><br>most of my hosts operate as clusters within a vm host cluster, and dynamically adjust their CPU and memory allocations as need dictates. in pure physical clusters, i would need each cluster to be powerful enough to handle its peak load, and at any time other than peak load, have idle (wasted) resources.<br><br>with the vm cluster, each application cluster is able to reach and sustain its peak load as needed, and since they are complimentary to each other, their peak loads do not overlap, but rather tend to pass around nicely, so in my case here, i am able to far more efficiently use the hardware by using virtualization<br><br>however, Roger Ramjet, if you are willing to fund the immediate and ongoing cost of replacing this with a direct physical implementation, i'm more than willing to put them side by side for a real life comparison<br><br><edit to correct spelling>
        erik.soderquist
    • RE: Oracle: Our full virtualization stack beats VMware

      @Roger Ramjet There are benchmarks on this. 3% - 5% hit vs native for HyperVisors is typical.
      VMs provide isolation in ways that processes do not. Plus you can move a VM around from physical machine to physical machine as needed in fact it can happen in the background automatically. And it allows running of multiple OSes. Provisioning a new server or servers can take minutes.

      The alternative is to have a single big Unix box that runs all the servers as processes. But in this case you don't have the same degree of isolation, you can't run multiple OSes (and some people really want to do that) and if your box has a problem you can't seamlessly move the processes somewhere else.

      As for your example that's so old. a 3.0 Liter today can achieve over 300 hp with more stuff than ever and still have a vehicle with more mpg.
      DevGuy_z
      • You didn't have to live it

        @DevGuy_z My first car - 4000 lbs and 140 hp! My friends favorite tactic was to pull in front of me and slow down - and then punch it. I wasn't going to catch them.

        You mention a lot of features that virtualization has, That's nice. Do you need them and use them? I never knew we NEEDED isolation - single big UNIX box work just great. Windoze is a different story (and Business Objects - the most fragile UNIX application ever).
        Roger Ramjet
    • RE: Oracle: Our full virtualization stack beats VMware

      @Roger Ramjet
      I love the analogy, but virtualization IS the current future. HPux, AIX and Solaris all have virtualization. But those OS's need to die and go away for the new kid on the block: Linux.

      Don't get me wrong, AIX ruled, and HPux came in second, Solaris ... but they are tied to IRON that I don't want to be bound to. Thus Linux gives me that freedom, as does virtualization. I've been a developer and sys admin for the past 30 years, and I'm all for virtualizing as much as possible.
      harrydbrownjr
  • As I've already commented on Dan's post...

    ...I figured I just leave the link here rather than repeating myself:

    http://www.zdnet.com/tb/1-87066-1649103?tag=talkback-river;1_87066_1649103

    Oracle prove what you say, but don't sue VMware!
    DevJonny
  • Oracle Collaboration Suite: Total Disaster

    We tried it for six months, went back to Exchange and Outlook. Pure garbage.
    cyberslammer
  • RE: Oracle: Our full virtualization stack beats VMware

    "...and that costs to deliver on this marketecture aren?t prohibitive."

    We have a site license for the EE server, but if we were to configure a VM RAC, we'd still have to buy licenses for each and every CPU. Oracle's reasoning is we could potentially convert every CPU to use with the RAC. So we buy standalone servers when we want to use RAC.
    ItzaRoos
  • Whooo!

    Boy when I read that I busted out laughing and all the other guys sitting around looked at me. Oracle's virtualization better than VMware's! Ah,that brightened up my whole day, I needed that. Thanks!
    mxyzplk
    • RE: Oracle: Our full virtualization stack beats VMware

      @mxyzplk laughing with you, as well as the rest of of us that actually use virtualization. I don't understand why someone would waste their time writing about things they probably have never used. They must get paid to do it?

      It's in the cloud....
      harrydbrownjr
      • RE: Oracle: Our full virtualization stack beats VMware

        @harrydbrownjr & @mxyzplk<br><br>I'll take a pound of whatever Oracle's smoking... it must be good stuff to think they're even close to VMware's offering.
        crazydanr@...
  • Say, what?

    >>>Oracle took a pre-emptive strike at VMware this week, maintaining that its integrated and expansive virtualization portfolio is far superior to the ?point? solution offered by the No 1 virtualization company.<<<
    So, by, "point solution", you mean for example that a Grocery Store doesn't offer Appendectomies? This must mean that the Grocery Store is only offering a "point solution". That's a completely ridiculous empty argument.
    >>>Time will tell, but Oracle?s timing could not be better.<<<
    Time will tell what, more FUD?

    Was there a link to some facts, that I missed in the blog?
    harrydbrownjr
  • RE: Oracle: Our full virtualization stack beats VMware

    Somebody needs to use a spell check. And I think Oracle's got an uphill battle winning over all the customers already happy with ESX.
    putty.master
    • count me

      @putty.master <br><br>count me as one happy with ESX!<br><br>i tested Microsoft's Virtual PC and Virtual Server, and Sun's VirtualBox, and Xen<br><br>currently use primarily ESX, and a handleful of VirtualBox instances for places where i can't justify the license fees and don't need the uptime... with Oracle at the reigns now on VirtualBox, i may switch to something else
      erik.soderquist
  • RE: Oracle: Our full virtualization stack beats VMware

    Oracle VM for x86 isn't ready for the enterprise, simple as that. You can read my facts on why I say that at http://weinshenker.net/blog/2010/08/20/why-oracle-vm-isnt-enterprise-ready/
    jweinshe
  • Oracle repackaging Microsoft's strategy?

    VMWare: "virtualize to virtualize...virtualization is an end unto itself"
    Microsoft: "virtualization is but one step toward cloud computing"

    Larry repackages well in desperate times!
    garciare
    • RE: Oracle: Our full virtualization stack beats VMware

      I think the primary motivations for virtualization are:

      - Efficiency: Make the most use of CPU, RAM, Power and Air Conditioning resources. Avoid wasting cpu cycles.
      - Flexibility and portablilty: snapshot, clone, template. Quickly allocate resources like CPU, RAM, storage as needed. Eliminate ideosyncratic hardware dependancies.
      putty.master
  • RE: Oracle: Our full virtualization stack beats VMware

    Oracle sucks
    Nsaf