BMC Software hopes to bring "dev" and "ops" together

BMC Software hopes to bring "dev" and "ops" together

Summary: BMC Software offers BMC Control-M Workload Change Manager and suggests that this is the best way to help "dev" teams automate change orders and help the "ops" team. Will this help BMC break through in a very busy market?

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BMC Software points out that "Most enterprises today suffer from a major bottleneck that limits their ability to change, as application developers and IT operations staff struggle to stay synchronized on frequent software changes across the business. The two teams are often bogged down by conflicting priorities, different workflows, and a series of “round trip” manual processes, which makes application changes slower to implement." To address that challenge, the company just launched BMC Control-M Workload Change Manager,  a collaboration console designed to help development teams collaborate with operations teams through automated, batch workflows.

Here's what BMC has to say about Control-M Workload Change Manager

Control-M Workload Change Manager provides developers with a simple drag-and-drop interface that makes it easy to define jobs and create or change workflows, eliminating manual and unstructured request exchanges. Control-M automates construction of the workflows, in accordance to site standards defined by IT operations, and submits requests to authorized workload schedulers. By streamlining collaboration, developers quickly deliver tested batch workflows that can be checked into the operational environment. The ability to reuse and easily modify existing batch jobs and workflows accelerates workflow changes while improving quality.

Snapshot analysis

Change management is a discipline that is part of ITSM (IT Service Management). The goal of this discipline has always been to create a systematic and planned way to deal with change requests and keep an organization's IT systems running effectively despite the fact that they are often designed as a multitude of independent services herded together to address a specific problem.  A change in one area often either forces changes or highlights unexpected problems in other areas.

As one would expect, change management is a crowded, dynamic market segment and there are many, many competitors, including suppliers such as Abreon, Aldon, Axios Systems, BMC, CA, IBM, ITG, Knoa Software, and quite a few others. Even if BMC's Control-M Change Manager were the best things since pockets, far better than sliced bread, it would be difficult for the company to make IT decision makers aware of the product, interested in what it could do for them, and persuade them to take action towards learning more.

BMC is trying to accelerate that process on the back of the catch phrase "devops." It hopes to leap over the competition by tying it to an industry movement towards unified development and operations teams and the growth of the "devop" staff position. By claiming that its software can help in the unification process, BMC hopes its technology will be widely adopted.

If we just look around the Internet a bit, it is clear that nearly all of the other Control Management technology and service providers are doing the exact same thing. It isn't clear that BMC will be able to get the industry's attention even if the product is outstanding.

Topic: Enterprise Software

About

Daniel Kusnetzky, a reformed software engineer and product manager, founded Kusnetzky Group LLC in 2006. He's literally written the book on virtualization and often comments on cloud computing, mobility and systems software. In his spare time, he's also the managing partner of Lux Sonus LLC, an investment firm.

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  • More overhead

    Forget "devops" and adding more relatives to the org chart. Fire some of the "ops" folks and encourage the "devs" to code against PaaS cloud services.

    Or is this all about empire retention and expansion rather than productivity and cost savings?
    dilettante