Boot Camp no boon for the enterprise desktop

Boot Camp no boon for the enterprise desktop

Summary: commentary Apple's announcement of Boot Camp, software that will allow you to install and run Windows XP on its recent Intel-based Macs, has predictably sent analysts and the blogosphere into a tizzy.I'm not particularly convinced that most consumers will find the idea of a machine that can boot into two separate operating systems appealing, especially since when running Windows you apparently can't access any of your Mac-generated files.

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commentary Apple's announcement of Boot Camp, software that will allow you to install and run Windows XP on its recent Intel-based Macs, has predictably sent analysts and the blogosphere into a tizzy.

I'm not particularly convinced that most consumers will find the idea of a machine that can boot into two separate operating systems appealing, especially since when running Windows you apparently can't access any of your Mac-generated files. But I'm even less convinced that it's going to make the slightest difference to Apple's virtually non-existent enterprise penetration.

Not everyone is so sceptical. Endpoint Technologies analyst Roger Kay told the Wall Street Journal that the new software might make Apple more appealing to corporate accounts. I doubt he's talked to any IT administrators. It's difficult enough trying to maintain an effective system image for one corporate desktop. What's the incentive to double the workload?

Indeed, Apple's announcement raises lots of questions which have no satisfactory answers. How many business-critical applications are there that run on Macs but don't run on Windows? And why would you switch from a model that lets you choose between multiple hardware suppliers to one that lets you choose from just one, especially when that supplier is not exactly known for being forthcoming about its future plans?

Apple enthusiasts have long talked about the "halo effect", the notion that iPod sales will ultimately see more consumers buy Macs rather than PCs. To date, market share data has failed to bear that notion out, and I can't imagine the sudden availability of Windows on a Mac is going to create a corporate 'halo effect' either.

Topics: Apple, Hardware, Microsoft, Windows

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  • Boot camp for Mac

    I have a Mac mini running OS X and VPC. I switch back and forth being Mac and Windows all the time, using expose'. Just move your mouse to the corner and you are on a different OS. And I can transfer data back and forth. I expect to do the same with Boot Camp using expose'.

    Mate.

    I just ordered my dual Mac today and when Vista
    comes out, I expect to be using it right along side
    Mac OS X.
    anonymous
  • Boot Camp Helps me dump Windows

    In a lab running almost exclusively on 12 Macs, I relish the oportunity to dump two deidicated Windows boxes [Windows 2000 and Windows 95] that I need just to run two applications that a dual personality iMac can run with Windows. One external vendor's app requires Internet Explorer, which M$ no longer supports on the Mac. We use it no more than 30 minutes per day. That computer does NOTHING ELSE. Another computer connects to a Sun Oracle database and is used less than 5 minutes each day to batch download test results via ODBC. [The Sun is a legacy box that resisted efforts for an OS X interface.] I ordered two Intel iMacs to kill those two systems plus two old Macs. I save energy, I get new systems that can do more. I save precious space in a site with none to spare. While corporate America may be slow to adopt, I and many like me, will jump at the chance to dump dedicated Windows systems and upgrade to more productive MacIntels.

    PS: Many individuals in corporate America would love to use the same computer they do at home. For the first time ever IT cannot say, "It don't do Windows, so we ain't buying a Mac!"
    anonymous
  • Apple Road Map

    The Apple Road Map is pretty clear from herein - as Intel announces faster chips, expect faster Macs.
    anonymous
  • "I expect to do the same with Boot Camp using expose'."

    Expect all you like, but that's not how a dual-boot system works.
    anonymous
  • I agree - sort of

    I agree that this probably won't make much difference to the corporate desktop market. After all, Macs do command a price premium because of their product design -- and corporate desktop buyers negotiating prices on PC fleets are hardly going to want to pay $200 more for a MacBook Pro because it has a nice case design.

    HOWEVER, this will have an interesting impact: people who want a Mac laptop anyway for its appearance and bundled software (OS X and iLife) for home use can now more easily justify the purchase as a salary-packaged work laptop. They can run XP at work and OS X at home.

    If you have a FAT32 partition you can share files across both OSs.

    So effectively a Mac becomes two PCs in one. Sure, it's not an 'integrated experience' ... but it's a darn sight more compelling than a PowerPC-based Mac was for work use.
    anonymous
  • Dual Booting will be phased out

    The release of Boot Camp as a beta is similar to the way Apple integrated their old MacOS 9 into MacOS X. Eventually, it turned out you can run the two side by side, without rebooting to switch.

    Boot Camp is a beta release now, and expected to be integrated into the next release of MacOS X, Leopard. I'd say by the time they get to the Leopard release (November?) they will have the Boot Camp functionality of Windows operating in another MacOS X window - much like virtual PC runs now.

    That said, I think it will be much sooner that we'll see third party utilities to allow partition sharing between environments.

    Call a few apple dealers to see how busy they were today. I think you'll be surprised at the number of corporate and institutional buyers who have had a major purchasing impediment removed.
    anonymous
  • Boot Camp is just the taste test

    I agree that Boot Camp is not of great use, except for those who want to consolidate onto a single machine. Like me for example, I travel with my Mac and my Windows Laptop, now I will just take 1 laptop with me...

    If you do a little research, OS X 10.5 Leapord is going to use virtualisation technology assisted by the new inclusions in the Intel chips. This will allow the running of multiple OS' not just Windows, but also Linux, and multiple instances of OS X. This will open up amazing possibilities for the platform.

    So Boot Camp is just a toy compared to what Apple will do in the future release of OS X in late 2006, early 2007. Apple would surely know that the end game is running the OS' side by side and allowing interactivity between them. I think this release is just the cat amongst the pidgeons. :)
    anonymous
  • XP splash screen on Mac ...!?!??!?!?!?

    OMG , I want to wash my eyeballs..!!!

    It's a crime, that's what it is..a crime..

    WHY???..oh WHY!?!?!?!? the humanity !!

    Will somebody PLEASE think of the children?

    Seriously, XP on Mac is just plain wrong, it's like a ferrari with a Mini engine in it, one that explodes into flames at random times too!
    anonymous
  • Boot camp

    I can see a real use for Boot Camp on laptops for those of us who develop software for both platforms and need to visit clients. I see less of an advantage for the desktop in the office unless there happens to be platform specific software that is necessary to use.
    Currently I have both on my office desk for necessity, however, when my new mac arrives that will change. I presume I'll have to transfer a file to a third memory storage (USB stick) when wanting the same file on each system
    anonymous
  • Boot camp

    Interesting reading about Boot Camp as I was looking at an old Dell laptop yesterday running OSX 10.4.6 natively and quite well. So I suppose that will be the next option for a cheap Mac, buy an old PC laptop and run Mac OSX
    anonymous