Brazil seeks to secure own emails amid US spy allegations

Brazil seeks to secure own emails amid US spy allegations

Summary: The country's president wants to create email that is free from prying eyes.

SHARE:

Brazil is moving to create a more secure form of email communications, with Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff revealing the order over Twitter.

Rousseff said (translated from Portuguese) that the nation's data processing company, Serpro, would be responsible for ensuring that emails sent throughout the federal government would be secure, private, free from any possible espionage, and ensure the "inviolability of official messages".

Serpro is already offering cloud services to government departments and agencies.

The country's Communications Minister Paulo Bernardo is on the record as previously asking the US government to explain its actions after documents leaked by whistleblower Edward Snowden showed that Brazilian communications were also the subject of surveillance by the US National Security Agency (NSA). The US is not expected to respond to these queries, but it is understood that a police investigation into whether the Brazilian government worked with the NSA is already under way.

Brazil's reputation in internet freedom rankings has slipped from free to partly free in the past year, due to controversial developments that have included the possible banning of Facebook in the country.

Topics: Government, Privacy, Security

Michael Lee

About Michael Lee

A Sydney, Australia-based journalist, Michael Lee covers a gamut of news in the technology space including information security, state Government initiatives, and local startups.

Kick off your day with ZDNet's daily email newsletter. It's the freshest tech news and opinion, served hot. Get it.

Talkback

2 comments
Log in or register to join the discussion
  • Headline: NSA replaces God

    I can imagine the glee of the NSA to have a new challenge/encryption scheme to break. Maybe they can raise our taxes or print up some more phony Federal Reserve money to pay for it.

    After all, why would anyone think that anyone living person has the right to privacy anymore? After Larry Seltzer’s moronic article titled ‘Completely private email is not legal and shouldn't be’ why should we even discuss the concept of anyone having any right to privacy? The real joke is that it is even a topic for discussion. After all privacy is too big a price to pay isn’t it?
    Astringent
  • Only one way

    To secure their sensitive communications is to build their own closed network. It can not touch the Internet.

    Of course they'll need to physically secure the infrastructure also but what can you do?
    MajorlyCool