Buying Cycle: The new way we're organizing content on ZDNet

Buying Cycle: The new way we're organizing content on ZDNet

Summary: ZDNet has a new method of organizing content that is all about helping business executives and IT leaders find the information they need to make smart technology buying decisions.

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TOPICS: CXO
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When you publish as much content as ZDNet does, one of the biggest challenges is organizing it in ways that readers can quickly find to get the information they need to answer questions and solve problems.

We understand how tough it is to find stories once they have scrolled off the front door news feed. That's why we introduced the hot topics on our red navigation bar last summer and that's why we've got a new layer of organization that we've lauched this month.

It's called "The Buying Cycle for Tech Decision Makers" and all about lining up our content with the way business executives and IT professionals use sites likes ours to navigate the process of identifying and purchasing new technologies. 

We have a new page that explains our thinking on this, led by the chart below.

buying-cycle-zdnet-05-2013

You may have noticed that we've started identifying which stage each article is in. You can find this information in the breadcrumb section at the top of the article, as shown in the screenshot below. 

buying-cycle-callout-05-2013

If you click the text with the name of the stage then it take you to our Buying Cycle explanation page

This is just the beginning. It's a foundation. You going to see us use this to organize content in unique ways in the future and we'll soon be doing it across both ZDNet and TechRepublic. Stay tuned.

Topic: CXO

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Talkback

6 comments
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  • Are you serious?

    You seriously believe that business executives and IT leaders would ever use information click baiters like SJVN or James Kendrick to make purchasing decisions?

    Too funny, you can't make this stuff up.

    I am amazed that fantastic writers like Ed and MJF stick around to allow ZDNet to sully their fine names.

    You ever want to be taken seriously by business executives and IT leaders, you could start by doing a spring cleaning of who you allow to publish on your site.

    You could stand to get rid of the apple and Linux shills in the talk backs. This place reeks of the apple marketing department, astro turfing division.
    toddbottom3
    • toddbottom3...Like business would be more interested in reading yours

      and Loverock Davidsons posts to get a better insight rather than qualfied writers like SJVN or James Kendrick is really the funniest thing you've ever posted, oh I left out your other buddy Owllllllnet as his post are a total scream also......I'm sure IBM, Google and Apple all wait on your every word....NOT

      End Of Story......Period
      Over and Out
    • Amazing. Even in tech blog articles

      You use Apple as the gold standard by which the blog's content must be measured.
      baggins_z
    • Oh please

      SVJN does occasionally troll-bait you Microsoft partisans, to be sure. But perhaps you haven't noticed, he does also still write a fair number of topical open source articles, such as the one he did about Rasberry Pi and Cloudstack.

      For those companies that do employ open source technologies (and most do, including your cherished Microsoft, on its Azure platform), these articles are relevant, and yes, might be involved in a decision to purchase.
      Mac_PC_FenceSitter
  • I consider ZDNet to be news, not Q&A.

    "When you publish as much content as ZDNet does, one of the biggest challenges is organizing it in ways that readers can quickly find to get the information they need to answer questions and solve problems."

    I consider ZDNet to be a news organization, not a Q&A organization. I've never used ZDNet to find an answer to a question, and I've never really solved a problem with the information given.
    CobraA1
    • And to be honest . . .

      And to be honest, I'm not sure I'm agreeing with this "buying cycle" thing, either. Sounds a lot to me like pseudo-psychology. Real psychology is questionable enough sometimes, this is just absurd.
      CobraA1