Canalys: 80 percent of all smartphones shipped in 2013 ran Android

Canalys: 80 percent of all smartphones shipped in 2013 ran Android

Summary: But Windows Mobile is coming on the strongest, poised to be the biggest disruptor in 2014.

SHARE:
zdnet-canalys-smartphones-2013

Read this

Tablet market to be dominated by small screens, says IDC

Tablet market to be dominated by small screens, says IDC

IDC's growth projection is based on inexpensive Android devices with screen sizes of about 7 inches driving demand.

For quite awhile now, there has been no question about which operating system dominates the smartphone market, domestic or worldwide.

Android's reach is not slowing down either, based on a new report from global market research firm Canalys.

Starting at the top, analysts estimated that approximately 998 million smartphones shipped in 2013.

Nearly 80 percent of them -- 785 million or so -- ran on Android.

But Windows Mobile is coming on the strongest, poised to be the biggest disruptor in 2014.

Highlighting Nokia's role, Canalys analyst Jingwen Wang suggested in the report that Microsoft's momentum could have continued if it weren't for "market uncertainty and caution" at the end of the year.

With Lumia accounting for such a dominant portion of Windows Phone shipments, the growth of the OS faltered too. It will be vital that on completion of the acquisition, integration takes place quickly and thoughtfully. Microsoft has much to do if it is to continue carving out a growing share of the smart phone market, not least driving the platform down to new entry-level price points, delivering innovation and new features, particularly at the high-end, and proactively working with, supporting and encouraging developers to commit to building compelling apps, and bring its app story closer to parity with its competitors. It cannot afford lengthy delays or distractions, and the combined Windows Phone devices team needs to hit the ground running.

For the year, Microsoft's mobile platform only grew its market share marginally to roughly three percent overall.

But it's the sheer rapid rate of growth during the fourth quarter that is really striking with 69 percent growth year-over-year.

In comparison by those same metrics, Android grew by 54 percent while iOS only grew by seven percent annually in Q4.

Apple's platform grew shipments slightly from 2012 to 2013, but it might not be as much as expected given the launch of two brand new smartphone models in the second half of the year. Shipments grew to roughly 154 million. But iOS's market share dropped from 20 to 15 percent.

Chart via Canalys

Topics: Mobility, Android, Google, iOS, Smartphones

Kick off your day with ZDNet's daily email newsletter. It's the freshest tech news and opinion, served hot. Get it.

Talkback

26 comments
Log in or register to join the discussion
  • Windows Phone Rocks

    Not enough credit for an excellent and smooth system.
    Sean Foley
    • No, it doesn't

      I am a dedicated user and am sick and tired of waiting for essential features to be delivered. How is it that *years* after this OS hit the streets, there is still no way to know what that Toast notification I just missed was -- or if I am away from my phone for a moment if I missed one altogether.

      There is, quite simply, not one thing you can do on WP that you can't do on lowly iOS, let alone Android. And there are quite a few things, including things *made by Microsoft* that work as well or better on those platforms. In fact, I'd argue *everything* made by Microsoft works as well or better on those platforms.

      As far as I am concerned, if Windows Phone Blue isn't a knock-it-out-of-the-park feature-packed super-update then this OS is dead meat.
      x I'm tc
      • You dont own a Windows Phone

        or else you would know that there are many things different on a Win Phone that no one else has. For example; I can read the weather without opening a weather app. Do you even understand how live tiles are different than icons? Also- home screen vertical scrolling is smoother than side swipe paging. If your a big fan of social media, the Windows Phone integrated people hub can't be beat. Office Hub is also excellent if you use your smartphone for productivity. And lastly, the back button is actually on the left of the phone on the side the arrow is pointed. Android places the back button to the right (dumb). iOS doesn't even have a dedicated back button which is just lame.
        Sean Foley
        • Um, anyone's phone can read the weather without a weather app

          1. When you install the weather app, allow notifications, or....

          2. "Siri, what's the weather today?" (Sub in Google Now, alternately.)
          Mac_PC_FenceSitter
          • The point is instant access to information

            not clicking a handful of buttons/swipes or waiting for Siri to hopefully translate your request into a web search that returns the results you want in order to get to one piece of information.

            I can set up a number of data points to display on my phone without even waking it up or unlocking it. Then set more on the lock screen. Then set more on the home screen. The moment I pick up my phone I'm already getting information I need and making decisions based on that without needing to hit the home screen, flip into some notification area and then start drilling down into various apps to see what I may or may not need.

            That works for some people, but other find the quicker and more customizable information spread that requires less clicks and swipes to be a better presentation of what they need and how they need it.

            Windows phone is a pretty excellent device with some advantages over other choices on the market.
            Emacho
        • You've never used Android

          "or else you would know that there are many things different on a Win Phone that no one else has. For example; I can read the weather without opening a weather app. Do you even understand how live tiles are different than icons?"
          - Never seen an Android widget then?

          "Also- home screen vertical scrolling is smoother than side swipe paging."
          - So install a launcher that has vertical scrolling. There's plenty on the Play Store.

          "If your a big fan of social media, the Windows Phone integrated people hub can't be beat."
          - Wow, sounds almost like the integration that Android has had for years. Not to mention Facebook wrote their own "Home" launcher: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.facebook.home&hl=en

          "Office Hub is also excellent if you use your smartphone for productivity."
          - There are plenty of office apps in the Android market place, almost all of which support Office 2013. Not to mention, MS have their own "Office Mobile" released on Android along with Skydrive.

          "And lastly, the back button is actually on the left of the phone on the side the arrow is pointed. Android places the back button to the right (dumb)."
          - No, some manufacturers *used* to place the button on the right, back before Android 2.3.x. Have you even looked at an Android phone in recent years? They are all now on the left.

          "iOS doesn't even have a dedicated back button which is just lame."
          - Really? If that's the only fault you can find with iOS you aren't looking very hard ;)
          ashanrath
          • Weak

            Evert response you made is a weak alternative or sloppy compromise, but nice try. Btw - I do like android notifications, but the widgets stink compared to live tiles.
            Sean Foley
          • Care to elaborate?

            Care to comment more on how each of those are sloppy or a compromise?
            ashanrath
          • I most certainly do own a WP -- a pair, actually

            And I am not even on my first. I joined the WP world from the Palm Pre on Sprint with an Arrive (probably the best -- if most underrated -- first generation Windows Phone). Then I switched to AT&T for a Lumia 920.

            WP offered a great foundation, but it has been essentially stagnant since the so-called "Mango" update while the rest of the world has moved on.

            About live tiles: Android has widgets. Same thing only much more functional and versatile.

            I do love the interface. I think WP is the second best looking phone OS ever made (webOS is first...but alas, we know how that turned out). Android is undeniably ugly, no matter the launcher. But you know what, you get over the ugly just like you get over the beauty. At the end of the day, it's just a phone, and the lack of real multitasking, a notification center, or a usable email client (that will let me edit a message before I forward it, or attach any file I might need to) is simply too much to bear.

            Add to that the fact that Skype, Xbox Music, Office, etc., all work as well or better on Android, and it is very hard to make the case to support Windows Phone. Hell, even Bing rewards are now on competing platforms *but not MS' own.* How messed up is that?

            MS' neglect of their mobile OS is nothing short of shameful, but it is what it is.
            x I'm tc
    • windows 95 was smooth on a 486-33Mhz processor with 16MB RAM

      But it was a poor OS other than that. Too many design compromises to try to maximize UI performance. I suspect windows phone is similar. Probably iOS too, but not as much.
      drwong
      • You suspect?

        You talk all this garbage about how these other operating systems are terrible and bad.... yet here you are talking about not having experienced them at all.

        You just showed how closed minded and ill informed you are.
        Emacho
  • Windows Phone coming on strong? In a word, no.

    You have a blue flat line next to a green flat line.

    By the same token, I suppose the four people who worship Fred the Giant Butterfly this morning can claim to be a faster growing religion than Islam if there were only two of them yesterday.

    Android is the winner of this race. Full stop.
    Mac_PC_FenceSitter
    • At least the green line is higher then the blue for WP

      Blackberry it's the blue line higher then the green, which isn't good.
      William.Farrel
      • Yep, my favourite phone maker

        But one with a very troubled looking sales profile.
        Mac_PC_FenceSitter
    • Make that three out of five.

      For Fred.
      rfoto
  • "Windows Mobile is...poised to be the biggest disrupuptor in 2014."

    What complete horse$hit!

    First of all, what the Hell is "Windows Mobile"? Microsoft deprecated "Windows Mobile" YEARS AGO. Second, if they're talking about mobile versions of Windows, they need to check their capitalization. Either way, Windows Phone, Surface, and "Windows Store apps" would all have to increase their market share by ORDERS OF MAGNITUDE to "disrupt" anything in the mobile space. They have such small market share that a doubling or even tripling of their quarterly sales volume still wouldn't amount to much more than what Android or iOS are selling in a week.
    matthew_maurice
    • Quit thinking so small scale

      sure, it's low, no arguing that. I just thought it odd that Apple missed expectations.

      Surface sales doubled

      And the stocks dropped. That's a bit of a disruption, I'd say.

      Or it could all be just a coincidence, because Apple selling a couple of million less of anything is just a rounding error, so no fear of competition.
      William.Farrel
      • Apple missed whose expectations?

        All their numbers were within guidance, and most of their sales were records. The fact that the sell-side analysts were wrong has nothing to do with Windows Phone or Metro. The truth is, this quarter EVERYONE was ALL OVER THE PLACE on accuracy (source: http://tech.fortune.cnn.com/2014/01/28/apple-best-worst-q1-2014/). The fact that Microsoft won't even announce sales numbers should tell you all you need to know about that. Windows Phone is a disruption of nothing, including Microsoft continued slide into irrelevance in the mobile space.
        matthew_maurice
  • Compiling android right now for fun

    I suppose its just like windows people who like full windows in their device no matter how impractical. I like the fact that android is open source, and I can build it myself.
    drwong
    • That is one of the benefits of an open source platform.

      You can build your own version, maybe call it Loverock.Davidson Android and build some apps like maybe build the William.Farrel Android app that farts and does the lip-sync thing. Be sure to open up telnet port for Loverock.Davidson Android.

      I guess I am feeling generous toward our Windows friends here.
      WhoRUKiddin