Canalys: PC shipments boosted in Q4 by holiday tablet sales

Canalys: PC shipments boosted in Q4 by holiday tablet sales

Summary: PCs (when including tablets) got a boost last quarter, but that trend shouldn't be expected to continue.

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The global PC industry might have ended 2013 on a high note, based on at least one recap for the fourth quarter.

Market research firm Canalys has published worldwide PC shipment figures for the December quarter. A big catch is that Canalys lumped tablets in with traditional PCs, meaning desktops and laptops.

Thus, when taken altogether, the worldwide PC market grew 17.9 percent annually during the three-month period. But when tablets are left out of the picture, shipments were actually down by 6.9 percent year-over-year.

For reference, Canalys offered the following definition for how it classifies a PC:

Canalys defines a client PC as a computing device designed to be operated by an individual and positioned to serve a broad range of purposes, achieved by running third-party applications, some of which can work independently of a network connection. When designed to be portable, it must be able to function without mains power and have a built-in diagonal display size of at least 7 inches.

Accounting for 48.3 percent of the PC game, tablets on their own grew by a whopping 65.2 percent annually, with roughly 76.3 million units shipped worldwide.

Analysts did not offer a total sum figure for PC shipments overall during the quarter.

On a vendor level, Apple led the top five, which consisted of Lenovo, Samsung, Hewlett-Packard, and Dell, respectively.

Cupertino had significant help from the iPad. Apple shipped approximately 30.9 million units -- 26 million of which were iPads. That's 84.3 percent of its total shipment volume for the fourth quarter.

Chart via Canalys

Topics: PCs, Hardware, Mobility, Tablets, Tech Industry

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7 comments
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  • THE OLD PC PARADIGM BELONGS TO THE AGES...

    Wintel is on it's deathbed.

    Consumers are speaking loudly: Windows and Intel chips are considered to be ancient computing artifacts to a new, mobile, tablet and phablet carrying, ARM chip using generation!

    Mcrosoft and Intel got too greedy and they intentionally held back mobile computing to keep their Desktop goose laying golden eggs.


    Whether you hate them are not, the world owes a debt of gratitude to Apple for ushering in mobile computing.

    Mobile will go down in history as the Asteroid that killed off the Wintel dinosaur!
    orandy
    • You haven't even convinced yourself that "Wintel" is dead

      and you're going to come here and try to convince us?

      That's actually pretty funny.
      William.Farrel
    • Apple is less greedy than Wintel?

      "Mcrosoft and Intel got too greedy and they intentionally held back mobile computing to keep their Desktop goose laying golden eggs.


      Whether you hate them are not, the world owes a debt of gratitude to Apple for ushering in mobile computing.

      Mobile will go down in history as the Asteroid that killed off the Wintel dinosaur!"

      Seriously? Are you suggesting that Wintel was making too much from computing, and Apple must be congratulated for fixing the situation, when Apple's iPhone business alone makes more money than all of MS?
      P. Douglas
    • PCs are still king, according to another article last week, right here on

      ZDNet.

      That other article reported that, in the entire world, about 285 million tablets were in use, and that includes sales of the last 4 years or so, or since the tablets form-factor started making any kind of sales.

      Again, that's 285 million tablets in use, worldwide. Now, contrast that to PC sales, which every year have been more than 300 million. So, if were to compare total sales for the last 4 years, PCs would have sold 1.2 billion and tablets a "measly" 285 million.

      So, when it comes to the so-called "post PC" mantra, reality says that, it's still very much a PC-centric-era".

      And, Apple did no such thing as "ushering in mobile computing"; they just created a "better" mouse trap with the iPhone, but mobile computing had already been around for a couple of decades, and good smartphones were already in existence when the iPhone debuted. But, a mobile phone is not a computing device, or it's not used as one, since the form-factor is not capable of replacing the functions that tablets and PCs are capable of doing.
      adornoe
      • Other numbers

        Worldwide tablet shipments totaled 217 million units in 2013, which is up from 144.2 million in 2012. That would make it a little bit better for tablets but for sure still shy from global installed PCs.
        The point for tablets is that they are still growing fast (but slowing down) while traditional PCs are basically standing still.
        AleMartin
  • MS' image

    I don't understand why MS, Intel, and Windows OEMs don't complain about IDC / Gartner's reporting of PC shipments, since they seem to restricted to PCs of older form factors, rather than PCs of all form factors. Both Intel's and MS' numbers showed about a 10% unit increase in Windows PC shipments in the last quarter, but just about everyone has ignored this, and have used IDC / Gartner's numbers.

    MS' CFO, Amy Hood, seems to be really good, because since she came into her current position, MS has masterfully painted a picture of being an enterprise company first, and being extremely good at it. The market has responded by the stock price going continuously up. I believe as long as she is around, and she does her job well, MS' stock will continue to do well. I think she is a genius at what she does.
    P. Douglas
    • Different companies collect and report differently

      I don't think I would take any one as representative of all, I would use a couple of them to get an average, which is probably closer to actual numbers

      Though I've always stated that I don't fully believe in Canalys' numbers, as they appear to move the bar around a bit too freely to get to where they want to be.
      William.Farrel