Catch Team: mobile note-taker adds enterprise-grade collaboration

Catch Team: mobile note-taker adds enterprise-grade collaboration

Summary: Catch, the increasingly popular mobile app for note-taking and collaboration, is aiming for increased enterprise take-up with the launch of its secure, managed Team product.

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Catch is a versatile and usable mobile note-taking application with some interesting collaboration features. It's available for iOS and Android devices, and on notebooks and desktops via browser extensions. Founded in 2008, Catch had 3.3 million registered users in May 2013 and is adding 6,000 a day on average, the company says.

According to Laura Yecies, Catch's acting CEO (and ex-SugarSync CEO), who spoke with ZDNet yesterday, this primarily consumer product has been finding its way into enterprises under the IT radar, in classic "consumerisation" fashion, thanks to the ease of use of its collaboration features. It's been particularly popular with field service, sales and marketing, and professional services teams, says Yecies.

This has prompted the company to create an enterprise-grade version, Catch Team, which adds the security and management functionality that IT admins require. The company has also announced alliances with two Mobile Device Management (MDM) vendors, Samsung (KNOX) and Citrix (Worx), with further MDM support promised.

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Catch organises content by colour-coded, shareable, 'spaces' (folders) and supports notes, images, audio clips, to-do lists and reminders. (Image: Catch)
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Catch allows you to set up colour-coded folders (which it calls 'spaces') and populate them with different kinds of content — notes, images, audio clips, to-do lists and reminders — via an intuitive "capture wheel" (see image, right). A hashtag system helps you organise and search your content, which is geo-located and automatically backed up and synced across devices registered with the same account. Folders (spaces) can be shared with other Catch users, which is when the support for comment threads, shared to-do lists, notifications and attachments comes into its own.

Catch operates on a "freemium" model: the Basic (free) plan gives you three spaces (plus two more when you register) and 250MB of storage; a Pro subscription costs $4.99 a month ($44.99 a year) and gives you 50 spaces, 2.5GB of storage and the ability to attach Office documents to your notes; the Team plan (starting at $144.99/user/year) provides admin tools, boosts the spaces allocation to 200 and storage to 10GB per user.

The new Catch Team version is aimed at enterprises seeking to control the proliferation of "bring your own" devices and apps. It supports business accounts linked to a management console where administrators can control user access to spaces, reassign space ownership, monitor the usage of licences, spaces and storage, purchase additional licences as required and ensure that company data is retained if an employee leaves.

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Catch Team supports business accounts and an administrator console where team membership, space (folder) ownership, resource usage and licence purchase can be managed. (Image: Catch)

When integrated with an MDM solution, such as Samsung' KNOX and Citrix's Worx, the IT department has full control over the Catch business accounts, with support for enterprise security features such as remote lock, remote wipe, encryption and policy management. Enterprises that remain nervous about storing data in the public cloud can opt for an on-premise version of Catch Team.

Tooling for the "social enterprise" is an increasingly competitive market, with products emphasising collaboration (Yammer, Jive), note-taking (Evernote, OneNote), storage (Dropbox, Box) and project management (Basecamp, Asana). Catch Team incorporates elements of all these approaches, and looks well worth further investigation. Look out for a review on ZDNet in due course.

Topics: Collaboration, Consumerization, Mobility, Reviews

About

Charles has been in tech publishing since the late 1980s, starting with Reed's Practical Computing, then moving to Ziff-Davis to help launch the UK version of PC Magazine in 1992. ZDNet came looking for a Reviews Editor in 2000, and he's been here ever since.

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