Centrelink scans its way to $131.3m

Centrelink scans its way to $131.3m

Summary: Centrelink will save $131.3 million over four years by scanning documents instead of keeping them in hard copy, according to the government's mid-year and economic fiscal outlook released yesterday.

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Centrelink will save $131.3 million over four years by scanning documents instead of keeping them in hard copy, according to the government's mid-year and economic fiscal outlook released yesterday.

The outlook details strategies that have been put into place since the budget was announced in May this year.

From 1 July 2010, according to the fiscal paper, Centrelink would scan all documents as close as possible to the point of receipt.

"This will increase efficiency by reducing the cost of transferring paper forms between Centrelink sites and record management units, and by reducing storage costs for paper documents," the paper said.

The initiative is being enabled by $6.6 million in capital funding this year and $12.4 million in operational funds, but was tipped to save $43 million next year, $50 million the year after that and $57.2 million in 2012/2013.

Topics: Government, Government AU

Suzanne Tindal

About Suzanne Tindal

Suzanne Tindal cut her teeth at ZDNet.com.au as the site's telecommunications reporter, a role that saw her break some of the biggest stories associated with the National Broadband Network process. She then turned her attention to all matters in government and corporate ICT circles. Now she's taking on the whole gamut as news editor for the site.

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2 comments
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  • Re Centrelink

    Let me be the first to welcome our social security overlords to the 1990's
    anonymous
  • Re Re Centrelink

    You are right there, but what will it cost to train their staff. With due respect, I have been to Centrelink on a number of occasions lately, and there IT skills leave a lot to be desired.
    anonymous