CES 2013: Broadcom debuts 'game changer' chip for HDTVs

CES 2013: Broadcom debuts 'game changer' chip for HDTVs

Summary: With the debut of a new HD video decoding solution, Broadcom boasts that UltraHD TV is supposed to be offer four times better resolution than existing HDTVs with 1080p60 displays.

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LAS VEGAS -- Broadcom has debuted what it is touting as "the first ultra high definition TV home gateway chip."

Not stopping there with the superlatives, Broadcom reps have described the BCM7445 UltraHD TV decoder solution as "a game changer for big screen and Internet video in the home" because it is supposed to "dramatically" improve the picture quality on larger displays.

See also: Complete CES 2013 coverage on CNET

To comprehend just how advanced this clarity is supposed to be, UltraHD TV is supposed to be offer four times better resolution than existing HDTVs with 1080p60 displays.

Thus, Broadcom asserts that this advanced picture technology requires a more efficient video codec. Broadcom is going a standards-based route by utilizing the High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) solution, which is said to enable users to download HD videos in "half the time" while reducing bandwidth usage by up to 50 percent.

Beyond the HEVC compression standard, the BCM7445 consists of a quad-core Brahma15 CPU and a quartet of 1080p30 real-time transcoders. All in all, this decoding solution is designed to offer a resolution up to 4096 x 2160p60.

Broadcom is also boasting a few features to the BCM7445 UltraHD TV codec intended to please everyone on both sides of the TV.

From the viewer's standpoint, the decoder solution supports simultaneous delivery of four HD video streams.

The BCM7445 also includes web domain security designed to separate Internet services from premium broadcast content with the intention of blocking malware.

Thus, content providers can deliver paid programming alongside open Internet apps for a more well-rounded connected TV user experience.

Samples of the BCM7445 UltraHD TV video decoder for the home are available now. But volume production isn't scheduled to commence until mid-2014.

More coverage on ZDNet from CES 2013:

Topics: CES, Broadband, Hardware, Mobility, Processors

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4 comments
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  • Lol ...

    "to enable users to download HD videos in "half the time" while reducing bandwidth usage by up to 50 percent."

    Can you say redundant?

    Ludo
    Ludovit
  • UltraHD TV is supposed to be offer four times better

    Still trying to get my head around that line. Of course, once you correct it then this post will be just as confusing.
    Glenn Castle
    • QHD resolution

      Last time I looked, a QFHD image was 3840x2160 pixels or the equivalent of 4 1920x1080 images. Calling this 4 times the resolution is a bit misleading since it doubles the resolution in the vertical and horizontal axis but it does use 4 time the pixels to do so. Of course, by the time we finally get a device capable of displaying 3840x2160 images in the average home, they will be pushing UHD with a 7680x4320 image. That does quadruple the horizontal and vertical resolution of a 1920x180 HD image. The price of that resolution will be needing a lot more storage if you are using the content locally or a fast Internet connection to use streaming content. Given that a Blu Ray movie hits 40 megabits/second for video content alone and guessing that image compression will improve by a factor of 4x, a connection capable of a sustained 200 megabit per second speed might work. Another issue is that at those data rates, the average 120 minute movie is going to chew up around 150GB.
      DNSB
  • When I went to school 4 times 4 was 16!

    ?
    allis0