CIO View: Why is RFID so exciting?

CIO View: Why is RFID so exciting?

Summary: Why is Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology so exciting? According to Cesare Tizi, ZDNet Australia's CIO of the year, it "opens up unbelievable business opportunities."

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Why is Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology so exciting? According to Cesare Tizi, ZDNet Australia's CIO of the year, it "opens up unbelievable business opportunities."

Tizi explains how Milan airport is planning to use RFID to track luggage, while the US retail giant WalMart will use the tiny chips to keep track of item inventories.

Following the retail theme, RFID could be used for supermarkets to track items. Thus when an item goes through the checkout, RFID could be used to rapidly count all the items and create an invoice, essentially making check out attendants redundant.

Tizi also sees RFID as important for security, as it has far less development problems when compared to biometrics.

Topics: CXO, E-Commerce, Hardware, Security, Servers

Munir Kotadia

About Munir Kotadia

Munir first became involved with online publishing in 1998 when he joined ZDNet UK and later moved into print publishing as Chief Reporter for IT Week, part of ZDNet UK, a weekly trade newspaper targeted at Enterprise IT managers. He later moved back into online publishing as Senior News Reporter for ZDNet UK.

Munir was recognised as Australia's Best Technology Columnist at the 5th Annual Sun Microsystems IT Journalism Awards 2007. In the previous year he was named Best News Journalist at the Consensus IT Writers Awards.

He no longer uses his Commodore 64.

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  • RFID Hype

    Cesare Tizi continues to hype uses for RFID that have been proven to be ill-conceived. While the automatic identification of airline baggage conveyed single file passing an RFID read tunnel may be feasible, The supermarket cart checkout scenario has been shown to be nothing more that "pie in the sky", primarily due to the fact that the group reading feature of RFID has been found to be largely inaccurate.
    anonymous