Cisco to integrate Citrix's NetScaler in cloud services portfolio

Cisco to integrate Citrix's NetScaler in cloud services portfolio

Summary: By integrating Citrix's application delivery controller (ADC), Cisco tightens a partnership that formed in October shortly after VMware bought Nicira to popularize the term "software defined networking."

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TOPICS: Cloud, Cisco, Networking
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Citrix and Cisco have tightened their partnership via a bundling deal for the networking giant's unified fabric network services line of products.

Under the deal, which is another installment of a strategic alliance launched last year, Cisco will integrate Citrix's NetScaler application delivery controller into its Cisco Unified Fabric Cloud Network Services lineup.

netscaler

By integrating Citrix's application delivery controller (ADC), Cisco tightens a partnership that formed in October shortly after VMware bought Nicira to popularize the term "software defined networking." Citrix also gets more throughput since its NetScaler 1000V will be sold by Cisco sales and channel partners. Cisco will also support Citrix's NetScaler 1000v line.

Cisco's cloud network services refers to an architecture to boost cloud deployments by integrating hardware and software. Cisco is counting on the NetScaler addition to bring application delivery knowhow and plans to integrate it with the Cisco Nexus 1100 Cloud Services Platform.

Add it up and NetScaler will ride shotgun with a lot of large Cisco deployments. According to the two companies, the latest partnership targets enterprise and service providers looking to automate cloud services. Provision will be integrated and deployment will be simplified with Nexus 7000 routers. Cisco's security, network analysis, wide area networking tools and routers will be integrated with Citrix's NetScaler 1000V.

The joint offering will be available in the third quarter via Cisco's sales channel.

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Topics: Cloud, Cisco, Networking

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  • Just seeing what is being read as spam

    "It's not like you can get any Dell you want with Linux or naked"

    True, but they're in the business to sell turnkey systems. Is it an OEM problem or a Windows/Linux problem if it won't install correctly? Hence why OEM's sell complete turnkey systems - If it doesn't run out of the box, it's an OEM issue, and they take care of it - cost effective.

    Why should OEM's spend time, money, and effort trying to get a Linux image running on their systems if it turns out in the end that it's the OS that has some poorly coded lines in it? Or if the Windows install is a shoddy pirated copy? Maybe a chip dislodged in transit, but how would they know?

    So it's not an MS contract requirement, or a Linux conspiracy, it's nothing more then business - "we've designed and tested this configuration, so we know it works. If it doesn't then it must be our hardware". No guesswork there.
    William Farrel
    • Just trying it again

      "Apparently, OEMs are required by their contracts with MS to make anything that's not a Windows preload a separate SKU."

      Was that hearsay, or written somewhere? Maybe you could get a copy of an OEM contract with MS.

      And here I believed that identical hardware loaded with something else besides Windows would have a different SKU number because of the OEM's inventory systems, a pretty standard practice worldwide.

      If one number came loaded with Windows or Linux, how would you know what you're shipping by that stock number alone?
      William Farrel
      • wierd

        it works when cut in half
        William Farrel