Citrix buys Cloud.com

Citrix buys Cloud.com

Summary: Everyone's piling into cloud. The latest is Citrix which has just announced that it's bought Cloud.

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TOPICS: Networking
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Everyone's piling into cloud. The latest is Citrix which has just announced that it's bought Cloud.com.

Cloud.com was among the more visible of the emerging category of cloud software management vendors, whose products are designed to manage entire virtualised datacentres, irrespective of location or hypervisor.

It remains to be seen if Citrix, which develops its own XenServer hypervisor, will continue to develop Cloud.com's CloudStack product in the same manner. However, since cloud is inherently a heterogeneous environment, it would be inadvisable to do otherwise.

Assuming it agrees, Citrix will have expanded its sphere of operations from just the datacentre into the wider cloud -- or at least, more than one datacentre.

There's little else in the announcement -- not even a price -- but at the very least, this is Citrix putting a marker down that it plans to play with the big boys.

Topic: Networking

Manek Dubash

About Manek Dubash

Editor, journalist, analyst, presenter and blogger.


As well as blogging and writing news & features here on ZDNet, I work as a cloud analyst with STL Partners, and write for a number of other news and feature sites.


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An IT journalist for 25+ years, I worked for Ziff-Davis UK for almost 10 years on PC Magazine, reaching editor-in-chief. Before that, I worked for a number of other business & technology publications and was published in national and international titles.

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5 comments
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  • Whilst today’s acquisition might be great news for Cloud.com, there is a real danger of it slowing down the emergence of public cloud services and limiting the options of cloud customers. Despite the cloud explosion in the media, even today there are only 500 public cloud service providers in the world. Compared to the 33,000 hosting companies worldwide, it’s a very small percentage that can actually put public cloud services in the hands of customers. With Citrix and CA Technologies calling the shots over who makes it as a cloud service provider, we may start to see a squeeze on the speed of delivery of cloud services which will fall behind customer demand. Smaller hosting companies will actually be the biggest driver of public cloud provisioning, but they won’t necessarily meet the revenue or scale requirements of the newly consolidated big boys to get access to the software they need to start offering cloud services. Ultimately users will be forced to buy in a constrained market, which could trigger a rise in pricing, further delaying the advance of the public cloud.
    Ditlev Bredahl
  • Ditlev, while I agree that hosting companies do outweigh cloud service providers, I feel your distinction is artificial. To me it seems that some of the top tier of hosts may fit into the realm of cloud service providers and seek to offer services with all the bells and whistles that goes along with that business model, but aren't a lot of hosts like landlords who own student housing? Many seem to provide basic services for people whose main motiviation isn't management, but price. In the world, tenements far outnumber towerblocks, and their residents don't tend to want the same things for the same prices...
    Jack Clark
  • Interestingly, Nexenta -- an open source storage software developer -- has said: "Citrix’s acquisition of Cloud.com has suggested it was an offensive move, intended to confront Vmware. But cloud insiders [whoever they are. MD] will tell you that this acquisition is as much to do with Citrix responding to the threat from OpenStack, which is a completely open source cloud stack..."
    Manek Dubash
  • Understand your point Jack, thing is though - to me it seems that cloud adoption (and innovation) is most likely to come from smaller setups (the student housing, if you like), while the large mass market consolidating hosts (your landlords) are actually the ones using price (rather than bells and whistles) as their USPs.

    In a previous life I ran one of the largest mass market hosting groups world wide, and when I wanted to take us to the 'cloud' I felt it was only doable by setting up an independent business unit (in our case actually a new physical office) in order to get the focus and momentum needed to make this happen, at the pace needed to obtain a position in the land-grab-like market the cloud service providers still operate in. So, I was playing both the landlord and student housing role...

    In my current gig (running OnApp.com) we have 250+ hosts as clients and we see the small and innovative hosting companies growing faster than the giants. They are able to move faster, they understand and target verticals and really take the cloud to places that our bigger clients do not.

    My point in the previous post was that those smaller hosts are typically not very well funded, and their profile would not fit the client types that CA and Citrix would typically work with.

    From our perspective, short term, this is obviously good news: we (onapp.com) love working with innovative businesses, small and large - but from an overall perspective I do think that it will slow down the cloud adoption.
    anonymous
  • The acquisition might be great news for Cloud.com, but there is a real danger of it slowing down the emergence of public cloud services and limiting the options of cloud customers. Despite the cloud explosion in the media, even today there are only 500 public cloud service providers in the world. Compared to the 33,000 hosting companies worldwide, it’s a very small percentage that can actually put public cloud services in the hands of customers.

    Cloud Management
    EvaBrianParker