Companies recognizing need for BYOD policy

Companies recognizing need for BYOD policy

Summary: A majority of companies do not have a BYOD policy in place, but they're at risk as workers bring more mobile devices to the workplace.

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Mobility is one of the hottest trends in technology, with cell phones, tablets, and other mobile devices being brought to the workplace in ever-increasing numbers. Known as "bring your own device" (BYOD), this change is clearly here to stay.

However, many companies do not have a formal BYOD policy, with only 24 percent reporting a plan in place, according to the Computing Technology Industry Association's (CompTIA) 2nd annual Trends in Enterprise Mobility study from February 2013. This is a 2 percent increase compared to the previous year. However, the number of companies that plan to create a formal policy has doubled from 20 percent to 40 percent in the past year as employers recognize the need for such a policy.

The CompTIA study also shows that 36 percent of companies have no policy in place, and no plans to instill one. This goes along with the TechRepublic BYOD Business Strategy Survey, also completed in February 2013, which revealed that 38 percent of companies had no plans to create BOYD guidelines.

As more employees bring their own mobile devices to work, companies must assess the security risks and costs. By doing nothing, company security is at risk as employees access email and other potentially proprietary data on their mobile devices. With a policy in place, access to data is controlled, and productivity can be extended to these devices.

If your company needs a BYOD policy, or if yours needs updating, get a head start and download the TechRepublic ready-made BYOD policy. This policy is available for free to all TechRepublic Pro subscribers, or can be purchased by non-subscribers.

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Topic: Bring Your Own Device

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4 comments
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  • Agreed

    BYOD is a perk to me for sure. Everyone works better if they can work how they like. The only challenges I have seen is collaboration (i.e. Mac vs. Windows Outlook issues) and the ability to expire data if an employee leaves a company. I have seen products that do the latter today, but are not widely known.
    darrellriddle
    • BYOD policy

      Thanks for your input, Darrell. It's much appreciated.
      Teena Hammond
  • thoughts

    "Known as 'bring your own device' (BYOD), this change is clearly here to stay."

    It's always been with us, long before the phrase "BYOD" was coined. Some organizations have always been okay with devices, and some never have. Some flip flop between the two, and some don't care at all.

    "However, many companies do not have a formal BYOD policy, with only 24 percent reporting a plan in place"

    Well, I can bet you that the CIA, FBI, and other intelligence agencies have such policies. The policy usually being "keep your personal device at home."

    But yeah - any organization should have *some* policy for personal devices.

    "If your company needs a BYOD policy, or if yours needs updating, get a head start and download the TechRepublic ready-made BYOD policy."

    $50 for a BYOD policy, eh? Do businesses actually buy policies?
    CobraA1
    • BYOD policy

      Hi Cobra - thanks for responding to my article. It is a wise decision for companies to have a BYOD policy in place. As for the $49 cost for a ready-made policy for non-TechRepublic Pro subscribers, compare that to the cost of hiring a lawyer to create one from scratch, or to handle a lawsuit if company security is breached by someone's mobile device.

      Our policies are popular with our readers, because they are a low-cost way of getting guidelines in place on a range of topics.
      Teena Hammond