Cyberwar: What is it good for?

Cyberwar: What is it good for?

Summary: In this week's episode, Cyberwar. What is Australia's place in the world of digital warfare? What are the implications for the NBN?

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From now on, Patch Monday will be contributed by Stilgherrian, an opinionated and irreverent writer, broadcaster and consultant based in Sydney.

Stilgherrian currently writes about the intersection of technology and politics for Crikey, ZDNet.com.au, New Matilda, his own website and others, and has a history as a radio broadcaster with Radio Adelaide, the ABC and Triple J.

From next week, Patch Monday will be returning to its regular Monday schedule.

In this week's episode, Cyberwar. What is Australia's place in the world of digital warfare? What are the implications for the NBN? Tom Worthington, a computer scientist who's been watching how Australia's defence forces use IT, helps separate the myth from reality.

We also look at the Australia Council's innovative "Geek in Residence" program, helping bring arts organisations into the 21st Century. Applications close 9 December.

Topics: Government AU, Government

About

Stilgherrian is a freelance journalist, commentator and podcaster interested in big-picture internet issues, especially security, cybercrime and hoovering up bulldust.

He studied computing science and linguistics before a wide-ranging media career and a stint at running an IT business. He can write iptables firewall rules, set a rabbit trap, clear a jam in an IBM model 026 card punch and mix a mean whiskey sour.

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Talkback

6 comments
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  • Australian Government Cyber Security Strategy

    This podcast was recorded before the Attorney-General released the Australian Government Cyber Security Strategy and IBM announced a new computer security centre in Canberra. As I said in the podcast, companies and the general public are the first line of defence in Cyberwar.
    anonymous
  • Australian Government Cyber Security Strategy

    Indeed, Tom. Here is that strategy's <a href="http://www.attorneygeneral.gov.au/www/ministers/mcclelland.nsf/Page/MediaReleases_2009_FourthQuarter_23November2009-AustralianCyberSecurityStrategyLaunched">announcement</a> and <a href="http://www.tomw.net.au/blog/2009/11/australian-government-cyber-security.html">your comments</a>.

    It is indeed interesting that the government chose to set up its own CERT (computer emergency response team) rather than expand the civilian AusCERT.
    anonymous
  • And here are those links again

    Bother. No HTML. OK, try these:

    http://www.attorneygeneral.gov.au/www/ministers/mcclelland.nsf/Page/MediaReleases_2009_FourthQuarter_23November2009-AustralianCyberSecurityStrategyLaunched

    http://www.tomw.net.au/blog/2009/11/australian-government-cyber-security.html
    anonymous
  • Coverage

    Glad to see you are staying away from telecomunications. That is more than ably covered by that excellent Mr Dobbie
    anonymous
  • It's called "division of labour", or something

    The program brief is specifically NOT to cover telcos, precisely because Phil Dobbie's "Twisted Wire" is doing that.

    There's a fuzzy boundary which we need to explore, though, so I'm after feedback.

    The way the Internet is changing society, politics, media and culture is a major interest of mine. It's not about "telecommunications" as such, in the same way that movie-making is changed by digital production techniques isn't about "the computer industry".

    Where is that boundary?
    anonymous
  • Oh, this comment was posted by me

    That is, Stilgherrian. Dunno why it ended up being "anonymous". Probably my incompetence.
    anonymous