Datacentre boom not NBN-based: Pacnet

Datacentre boom not NBN-based: Pacnet

Summary: Business trends and not the promise of high-speed fibre via the National Broadband Network (NBN) is driving datacentre growth in Australia, according to Asian telecommunications company Pacnet's CEO Bill Barney.

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Business trends and not the promise of high-speed fibre via the National Broadband Network (NBN) is driving datacentre growth in Australia, according to Asian telecommunications company Pacnet's CEO Bill Barney.

Bill Barney

(Credit: Josh Taylor/ZDNet Australia)

Speaking at the launch of Pacnet's new $40 million datacentre in Sydney today, Barney said the demand for datacentre space in Australia was so great that the company would be going ahead regardless of whether the NBN reached completion or not.

"Our view is, we'll fill this centre whether [the NBN] is built or not," he said. "I think until there's actually stuff in the ground and the thing is operating, you won't see much. We don't plan around it," he said.

Pacnet's Australia and New Zealand CEO Deborah Homewood said the increasing consumerisation of business technology, along with the demand for greater bandwidth and storage for video streaming, was driving datacentre uptake.

"[Enterprise] is choosing to do their business differently. The consumer behaviour is driving how enterprise is doing business and that requires datacentre space and greater use of bandwidth, a different way of doing things," she said, adding that many enterprise businesses were now moving their services into datacentres where they might not have before.

"[Small to medium enterprises] we see being somewhat early adopters of that and that's just drive by; they don't have the space or the cost."

Even if the National Broadband Network wasn't a driver between the boom of datacentre construction in recent times, it was good in some ways for the centres, according to Barney.

"It has some advantages; it typically drives lower wholesale prices for carriers, which is a good thing, even before it is built," he said, but added that the network wasn't the only driver for strong competition and low prices.

"We've been a big advocate that [an undersea] cable needs to be built. We don't think that NBN on its own is the answer, there's a bunch of answers that gets you low-cost internet access," he said.

Last year Pacnet announced it had signed on to the Pacific Fibre Consortium, which is constructing a new sub-sea cable between Australia, New Zealand and the United States.

Topics: NBN, Broadband, Hardware, Servers

About

Armed with a degree in Computer Science and a Masters in Journalism, Josh keeps a close eye on the telecommunications industry, the National Broadband Network, and all the goings on in government IT.

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