Can Samsung out-Apple Apple in BYOD?

Moderated by Larry Dignan | March 18, 2013 -- 07:00 GMT (00:00 PDT)

Summary: Can the Galaxy S4 help Samsung shake Apple's hold on the mobile enterprise?

Matt Baxter-Reynolds

Matt Baxter-Reynolds

Yes

or

No

Matthew Miller

Matthew Miller

Best Argument: Yes

77%
23%

Audience Favored: Yes (77%)

Closing Statements

Samsung can deliver

Matt Baxter-Reynolds

As the other Matt says, it's not like Apple is going to sit idly by while Samsung eats its lunch.

But this particular fight isn't fought out in corporate procurement. No Apple representative is going to visit the CTO of a business and wine and dine them with a hope to getting their employees to buy iPhones for their personal phones. That's just plain illogical.

I think it's a huge mistake to write off Apple, claim that the iOS UI is outmoded, etc. What's changing is that someone has worked out how they might be able to "out-Apple Apple" within the general market. I'm surprised it's Samsung -- I didn't really see that coming.

So Samsung and the other Android players will get more play in BYOD scenarios simply because they will get more play generally. And I hope firms allow Android devices in. Points about the malware problem on Android are valid and well made. It would be *much* better if we didn't have to worry about that. But the MDM story on Android is first-rate. Tools such as SAFE prove that Samsung can deliver the features that enterprises want.

Don't underestimate Apple

Matthew Miller

It's always a pleasure debating with Matt across the pond as he brings a perspective from outside the US and challenges me to think more about the subject at hand. Even though we debated the Samsung - Apple BYOD issue you can see we had many agreements about what Samsung and/or Google need to do to challenge Apple in the enterprise space.

These include changing security perceptions, continuing to promote an entire line of Galaxy products, and getting the word out that enterprise security and mobility is a focus for Samsung.

The problem for Samsung is that Apple isn't going to sit idly by and let them take over. I have seen an increase in promotion of the enterprise space from Apple and know that employees are still bringing in new iPhones to the office without even much consideration for other platforms. Apple released an expensive iPad upgrade targeted to towards the enterprise and I think we are going to see more from them in 2013.

The key word is 'can'

Larry Dignan

As much as I hate to vote with the crowd when judging these debates, I have to go with Matt Baxter-Reynolds on the Samsung-Apple-BYOD debate.

The key word in the debate is "can." Samsung has all the parts to be an enterprise player and definitely has the consumer market share. Samsung certainly can be a BYOD star. The problem is some things are out of Samsung's control. Enterprises tend to like inertia, as Matthew Miller noted. And now that Apple is embedded, it will be hard to root out. 

Talkback

24 comments
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  • Having shown sales pitches to others,

    those that say employees want freedom to mix personal and work lives and do work anywhere at any time, EVERY person I've showed such propaganda to has said they do not agree with the claims that the BYOD folk are pitching.

    But I do also know a couple people who did ask to have email routed on their tablet or phone... they didn't care for the terms and conditions, but that's what they want.

    Just wait until people have an on-the-job accident, but it didn't happen on-premises so there... assuming the person does any work from off-premises in the first place, since such abuse is not a rare concept...

    But if all these lines are being blurred, eventually even the most dim will see a light bulb turn on...
    HypnoToad72
    Reply 1 Vote I'm Undecided
  • The consensus will vote YES but the reality is NO.

    The BYOD is still controlled by the same group of people that took away choice in IT for the past 20 years. This group does not have "freedom", "choice" and "configurability" as their primary reasons for making a decision. This is not to say Apple will "win" the enterprise since I think MS still has a strong potential in that area due to entrenched positions. For most large companies, BYOD will still be BYOD ALAIIOTL (as long as it is on this list).
    Bruizer
    Reply 1 Vote I'm for No
  • Of course Samsung can ... but will they.

    No one even considers Windows RT a potential contender yet but that could be a game changer.

    To address the question though ...

    Apple without Jobs is a different company and is going to have to learn once again how to be agile instead of slow and steady. I think Tim Cook called it "incremental".

    Apple's success has been tied to Job's willingness to go his own way - but this approach also introduces incompatibility between iPad and other enterprise tools - namely Windows.

    Samsung has partnerships with Apple, Google, and Microsoft - putting it in an excellent position to offer BYOD tools which are fully compatible with other enterprise tools - including Windows RT should they choose.
    M Wagner
    Reply Vote I'm for Yes
  • What companies are these?

    Most IT departments consider smartphones an annoyance. BYOD is usually a nightmare. Use a work computer to get work done, use a work phone to talk to people. Use your smartphone to play games while you setting in the toilet. Don't try to be the "cool" guy that uses a smartphone to edit a spreadsheet.
    Sean Foley
    Reply 3 Votes I'm for Yes
  • Grrrrrrrrr

    Apple is the big slow dog, Samsung is the quick, aggressive, win with any tactics dog. Quick, smart, and focused almost always gets the job done....That said, perhaps the big dog will learn now that it is being constantly challenged. It has a head start, and plenty of "bulk" ($$$) behind it. Perhaps someone new at the helm?
    louishelps
    Reply 1 Vote I'm Undecided
  • Yes, No, Maybe, Do I Care?

    I'll just point out that if BYOD becomes Apple vs. Samsung, the secondary loser is Microsoft and the primary losers are the other mobile phone makers.
    DannyO_0x98
    Reply 1 Vote I'm Undecided
  • Microsoft will succeed

    let me digress a little, but i think MS has the potential to win big in BYOD, considering their foothold in IT
    Lawson Obarugbi
    Reply Vote I'm Undecided
  • Samsung will win.

    History has shown that closed source platforms have more attempts at attacks than their open source opponents. Also, the benefit of Android compared with other Linux distributions is that the average person can access it easily without having to download an ISO file, and mount it to a storage device or CD/DVD due to mass production of devices. On the other hand, with Ubuntu mobile, one might be able to carry Steam right in their pocket.

    Finally, people who write and release viruses and other malicious software are most likely to attack the platform with the greatest market share. Think about it. We are starting to see more viruses targeting OS X.
    Richard Estes
    Reply 2 Votes I'm for Yes
    • Not a single thing you wrote is true

      First of all, do you really think you are making ANY original statement here?!? There is no need to "think about it". Nothing you wrote has not been beaten to death a decade or more ago.
      Second, the thing you are asking people to "think about" is not even true. The "security through obscurity" myth is so easily disproved, it is laughable. Third, "we" are not "starting to see more viruses targeting OSX". Not by any metric whatsoever. First, there still are no viruses for OSX. If by viruses you incorrectly mean all malware, again, the rate of malware introduction has NOT accelerated, and there is NO correspondence between OSX market share and malware introduction rate. Care to post any empirical data to refute this? Good luck with that.
      Finally, as to your first statement, "history" has shown nothing of the kind.
      .DeusExMachina.
      Reply 2 Votes I'm Undecided
  • Samsung will win.

    History has shown that closed source platforms have more attempts at attacks than their open source opponents. Also, the benefit of Android compared with other Linux distributions is that the average person can access it easily without having to download an ISO file, and mount it to a storage device or CD/DVD due to mass production of devices. On the other hand, with Ubuntu mobile, one might be able to carry Steam right in their pocket.

    Finally, people who write and release viruses and other malicious software are most likely to attack the platform with the greatest market share. Think about it. We are starting to see more viruses targeting OS X.
    Richard Estes
    Reply 1 Vote I'm for Yes