Great Debate: Can Whitman turn around HP?

Moderated by Andrew Nusca | September 26, 2011 -- 07:00 GMT (00:00 PDT)

Summary: Can Meg Whitman turn around HP? Jason Hiner and Larry Dignan debate whether HP's latest CEO can fix all that ails the computing giant.

Jason Hiner

Jason Hiner

Yes she can

or

No way

Lawrence Dignan

Lawrence Dignan

Best Argument: No way

The Rebuttal

  • Great Debate Moderator

    That's a rap!

    ???and this concludes the live portion of this week's Great Debate. Thanks to our debaters for their quick fingers in the final stretch; and thanks to you, the audience, for your patience during our technical issues midway through. Don't forget to check back tomorrow to see our debaters' closing statements -- then again, on Thursday, for my verdict. (And don't forget to submit your vote in the comments below!)

    Posted by Andrew Nusca

  • Great Debate Moderator

    On to our final question.

    Noted! On to our final question, with three minutes left: which is a greater problem for HP: strategy, or execution?

    Posted by Andrew Nusca

    Strategy with a big "S"

    As I've said, HP's managed printing business -- which is purring like kitten -- shows that there are teams at HP that know how to execute. Of course, there's also the WebOS/tablet team that laid an egg with the TouchPad hardware, but I think that was due to a drastically reduced release schedule. If HP can get a north star to follow, there are still plenty of talented engineers and managers that can make good things happen. Can Whitman deliver that vision? In the short term she'll just need to thread the needle between software and services and the likelihood of remaining in the PC business. For the long term, she (or the next leader) is going to need something more powerful to distinguish HP from just playing a little brother role to IBM.

    Jason Hiner

    I am for Yes she can

    HP's ultimate strategy may take decades to play out

    Today it's execution tomorrow it's strategy. If HP blew out its last three quarters, Apotheker wouldn't have been tossed. Whitman has the problem diagnosed: HP has to execute better. Let's assume Whitman fixes those short term problems. The long term issues revolve around strategy and businesses under siege. Servers are threatened by the cloud. Printers are threatened by the digital age, e-readers and the like. After years of talk about the paperless society folks print less now. Less printing means less ink and a lot of headaches for HP. HP Services needs to move up market, but it's not like high-end consulting comes easy. PCs are under fire from mobile devices. Pick any market HP has and there are secular and competitive challenges. That's why in the end, I think the clock runs out on Whitman. HP's ultimate strategy---assuming one is crafted---may take decades to play out. The best case scenario in my view is that Whitman sets the table for the next CEO, who will hopefully be an internal candidate that can stick to a multidecade theme. The first talkback below sums it up best: HP needs continuity, but it's unclear that the institutional knowhow is there to support Whitman or a long-term strategy.

    Lawrence Dignan

    I am for No way

  • Great Debate Moderator

    Question 5.

    ...and we're back! Next question: CEOs are great, but what constraints do HP's board and Wall Street have on the company's ability to innovate?

    Posted by Andrew Nusca

    CEOs have plenty of room to operate

    With the recent debacles at Yahoo and HP, there has been too much credit given to how much control a board of directors has. The CEO is the quarterback and she or he runs the offense and almost always calls the plays. If you win the Super Bowl, the quarterback is almost always the MVP. If you lose games you shouldn't, most of the blame usually gets directed at the quarterback. That's the price of being a leader. As for Wall Street, when you're a public company, you live quarter to quarter. You have to manage expectations and you have to be a great storyteller to get a bunch of boring bankers excited about your company. The quarterly grind can stifle your long-term planning and investments at times, but almost all of your competitors have to deal with the same thing. That's the game.

    Jason Hiner

    I am for Yes she can

    The burden of proof is on HP's board

    HP's board has been dysfunctional for years. Lane has argued that this time is different and the board is new. The burden of proof is on HP's board. HP has to hit its numbers and that's a constraint. HP's board needs to stay quiet and become a background item. Wall Street is in no mood to hear that HP is going to double its R&D and marketing spend so that's a big constraint. I'd say Wall Street is probably the bigger constraint today. The board loves Whitman---at least for now.

    Lawrence Dignan

    I am for No way

  • Great Debate Moderator

    Looks like we've got some technical issues.

    Larry Dignan is having some connection issues. Bear with us for a minute...

    Posted by Andrew Nusca

  • Great Debate Moderator

    Which begets Question 4.

    We've talked a lot about the company, and we've just talked about the outgoing CEO, now let's talk about Whitman herself. There's quite a bit of discussion in the TalkBack section below about how gender plays a role in all this, but I'll set that aside for now and simply ask: How does Whitman's resume factor in? Which areas of her experience (eBay, gubernatorial run) will she draw from?

    Posted by Andrew Nusca

    Whitman can command respect

    The biggest asset that Whitman has going for her is that she can command respect. She's a big name and because of that when she speaks, people are going to listen -- even if they are initially looking for everything wrong with what she's saying in order to argue it. That's still big, because she's not going to be ignored. Because of the messy divorces with Hurd and Apotheker, the bar is set pretty low for Whitman. She will likely get a honeymoon period where she'll get the chance to win over employees and the public. And then, her biggest task will be becoming a better storyteller than the past two CEOs and telling of us a good, believable story about the kind of company HP can become over the next 3-5 years. She's definitely capable of that. She'll just need some good lieutenants to help with enterprise parts of the story.

    Jason Hiner

    I am for Yes she can

    Resume is a conundrum

    Whitman knows branding from stints at eBay, Disney, Hasbro and Proctor & Gamble. She'll excel at pushing HP. As for the governor run, Whitman knows how to campaign---but obviously needs work given she didn't win---and she will need those political skills to win over HP's employees. On the bright side HP's problems look like a walk in the park compared to California's. At HP she actually has a shot at success.

    Lawrence Dignan

    I am for No way

  • Great Debate Moderator

    On to Question 3.

    We wouldn't be debating this topic today without Leo Apotheker. Tell me: where at HP did Leo Apotheker succeed? Where did he fail?

    Posted by Andrew Nusca

    Right strategy, wrong message

    Apotheker had it right that HP will need to focus on servers, software, and services in order compete as a global technology company over the next decade, but his timing and delivery of that message were poorly done. He needed to lay out a clear vision and HP's path to getting there before he started pulling the rug out from under the PC business and WebOS. Because of the high visibility of PCs and tablets, when Leo made his statement, everyone lost track of the fact that his enterprise message had some merits and instead focused on him sinking the world's largest PC maker and killing a tablet and operating system that has often been considered one of the most capable competitors to Apple.

    Jason Hiner

    I am for Yes she can

    He failed at nearly everything

    Apotheker succeeded at thinking globally and pushing software more at least in theory. He failed at everything else. Communications was a disaster. His last earnings conference call where HP killed the Touchpad, floated the idea of a PC business exit, and announced the Autonomy purchase was probably the most painful executive performance I've seen. It hurt. Apotheker's biggest failure was not learning from his mistakes at SAP. The strategy looked decent, but the delivery and communication of it left a lot to be desired. You can't miss three consecutive quarters.

    Lawrence Dignan

    I am for No way

  • Great Debate Moderator

    Interesting.

    Interesting points. Let's walk the walk and not just talk the talk, shall we? I ask: what assets does HP have now to pursue this?

    Posted by Andrew Nusca

    HP: Printers and enterprise relationships

    As I alluded to in the first question, HP will likely pursue an enterprise course as its main strategy (even if it decides to keep the PC business around as a boutique business). The company has built a solid server business, thanks to its Compaq acquisition a decade ago, and has strength in IT services thanks to its more recent purchase of EDS. Even more importantly, it has a long list of established enterprise and government customers who count on the company for enterprise solutions. That's where HP needs to put its focus. The other big factor in its favor from an enterprise standpoint is the managed printing business. HP has done an excellent job in recent years of providing an end-to-end printing solution for enterprises. Customers don't even have to order toner any more. The printer alerts HP when it's low and new cartridges are automatically shipped. This may be a shrinking business, but the service itself shows that HP knows how to execute when it has a clear vision to work toward. That's what Whitman needs to provide now -- a clear target for HP's troops.

    Jason Hiner

    I am for Yes she can

    On paper, you'd think that HP should be just swell

    HP has a lot of assets. It has HP Labs, which is a historical name and still delivers good research. HP also strong businesses. PC, servers and printers are all No. 1. Networking is No. 3 behind Cisco and Juniper but has enough scale to be dangerous. Software is a small portion of overall revenue, but there's potential. And HP Services needs work, but isn't chopped liver. On paper, you'd think that HP should be just swell. However, Whitman's initial speaking tour focused on telling us that "HP matters." Really?!? Don't we know that already? So why not argue the positive side like Jason? HP lacks the capital and patience to engineer a big turnaround in Whitman's tenure. She has to hit her numbers and build up the political capital to focus on the long term. Unfortunately, she has a pricey Autonomy acquisition to work out, three quarters of disappointment from Leo Apotheker and a strategy that doesn't look different enough. To get HP humming may take multiple decades.

    Lawrence Dignan

    I am for No way

  • Great Debate Moderator

    Welcome to ZDNet's Great Debate III

    Welcome to the third installment of our new Great Debate series. This week, we're debating whether Meg Whitman will drive Hewlett-Packard into future success???or off a cliff. Joining me are editors-in-chief Larry Dignan and Jason Hiner. Let's start big, gentlemen: What kind of company should HP be in the 21st century?

    Posted by Andrew Nusca

    There are two choices

    Well, that's the big question. That's the reason that we've ended up with the Apotheker/Whitman revolving door at HP. The company hasn't figured out what it wants to be all about. There are essentially two choices. Does it want to be IBM or Apple? Does it want to be an enterprise company that fades into the background a little bit but makes a lot of money? (That's the IBM equation.) Or, does it want to be a consumer brand that makes low-margin products but sells a lot of them and is beloved by the public? (That's more of the Apple direction, although Apple can demand better margins.) Apotheker clearly wanted to move HP to becoming IBM. That's not a surprise since he came from another enterprise company, SAP. But, Apotheker didn't communicate that very well to either HP's troops or to the market. This should have been handled much more deftly. That said, Apotheker's strategy could still prevail, or at least aspects of it will.

    Jason Hiner

    I am for Yes she can

    HP needs to get back to its roots

    If I could answer that definitively I'd have one great day rate as a consultant. Another possibility is that'd I'd be CEO---at least until the board threw me out. Seriously though. HP needs to get back to its roots. I've heard that from numerous employees both past and present. The problem: Its roots---science and engineering---may have been spun off with Agilent more than a decade ago. HP somehow thought it was wise to spin off Agilent and double down on PCs. Oops. Whatever HP decides it wants to be when it grows up it needs to focus on research and development and carve its own path. The current model revolves around being someone else---IBM, Cisco, Apple, whoever's next. The problem is that HP has starved R&D at 3 percent of revenue all through the Mark Hurd years. Now HP doesn't have the financial heft to suddenly jump to 6 percent (IBM levels) or even higher. That's why I'm arguing that Whitman can't turn around HP. HP's R&D problems will last longer than Whitman's tenure if history is any guide.

    Lawrence Dignan

    I am for No way

Talkback

94 comments
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  • RE: Great Debate: Can Whitman turn around HP?

    There is nowhere but "up" for HP after a such an inept HP board and its chosen CEO. Hurd was at least certain of the direction of HP, but Apotheker was clueless, scrambling to save his job in the end, behaving like a desperate school janitor who got written up too many times. When the HP board gets together for all but 4hrs a year, screaming bloody murder at the quarterly stock report and just want a "magic bullit" CEO that can lead the company toward a strong product and services leadership position in a reasonable amount of time. The board behaves like they are on the golf couse for 364 days of the year and get upset when HP's earnings fall. They behave like the rich, aloof parents who drop their spoiled kid/ceo in private school and only check in when the principal calls. However, when one kid disappoints, the board merely adopts a new kid- so much for continuity.
    flyguy29
    Reply Vote I'm Undecided
    • RE: Great Debate: Can Whitman turn around HP?

      @flyguy29<br><br>That is what I was thinking, ...but you said it so well!

      I am thinking, "None of the above" since the board will undermine her, and then replace her, probably just far enough into the renovation process to make the house unlivable!

      I actually feel sorry for her. She has been set up, and not in a good way!

      (Just my opinion.)
      mlashinsky
      Reply 1 Vote I'm Undecided
    • RE: Great Debate: Can Whitman turn around HP?

      @flyguy29 I strongly disagree with you. Hurd only knew one thing, cutting costs. He drove the company down the drain by reducing R&D, reducing collaboration, reducing the fighting spirit of employees. This only mantra was cost reduction. Actually, HP's vision at that time was cost reduction, this is how bad it was. Leo at least tried to come up with a vision, you can agree or disagree with, but it's a clear and consise vision. He could not communicate it and was unable to portray his moves with the vision in mind. There you have a point. Now, I don't know where you got that info of the board meeting for 4 hours every quarter, but that is far, very far from the truth. So, all in all, I believe HP has a vision that makes sense, give them time to execute it.
      christian.verstraete1
      Reply Vote I'm Undecided
      • RE: Great Debate: Can Whitman turn around HP?

        @christian.verstraete@... can't disagree completely, but the nail in the coffin was the 180?? change of direction - those who survived the first cut were hit on the second stroke.

        Only - where is HP vision now?
        csaager
        Reply Vote I'm Undecided
  • RE: Great Debate: Can Whitman turn around HP?

    Great post.
    Accompagnatrici
    Reply Vote I'm for Yes she can
    • RE: Great Debate: Can Whitman turn around HP?

      @Accompagnatrici That was well done. You should be doing this.
      Larry Dignan
      Reply Vote I'm Undecided
      • RE: Great Debate: Can Whitman turn around HP?

        @Larry Dignan
        Are you offering him your job? On the basis of saying "me too"?
        bunkport
        Reply Vote I'm Undecided
  • RE: Great Debate: Can Whitman turn around HP?

    I dont think so. Also HP needs a transformational leader not a transactional leader. Leo was never a transformational leader, but had an agenda for that. I see the same pattern here with Meg too. She is a great transactional leader, not a transformational leader. She has charisma, but how much board would allow her to succeed in using that charisma to transform HP into success is a big question.
    Ram U
    Reply Vote I'm for No way
  • Meg is a celebrity CEO

    I foresee Meg having the same issue as Leo: Leo was very successful at SAP, where he made a mint selling software and services. He gets the helm at HP and tries to use the winning formula: software and services. I wouldn't bet against Meg doing something similar and trying to fix HP by turning it into eBay.

    Whoever takes the CEO spot can learn everything they need to know in 30 days - spend 15 of those days answering the phone for consumer tech support, and spend the other 15 answering the phone for server tech support. That'll provide Meg - or whoever - a better idea as to what's broken than any stack of reports the executive VP's will give her.

    Joey
    voyager529
    Reply Vote I'm for No way
    • RE: Great Debate: Can Whitman turn around HP?

      @voyager529
      are you serious? answering the t/s line *might* be indicative of 'what's broken' but it surely won't show how or if to fix it. nor does that cover all of HP's woes at this time.
      would you check the air in your car tires for assurance that the engine is fine?
      BitBanger_USA
      Reply Vote I'm Undecided