Dell acquires StatSoft, adds analytics to software stack

Dell acquires StatSoft, adds analytics to software stack

Summary: StatSoft's flagship software is Statistica Enterprise, which filters and analyzes data from multiple repositories.

SHARE:

Dell on Monday said it acquired StatSoft, a company that specializes in analytics and data visualization software.

Terms of the deal weren't disclosed. StatSoft is based in Tulsa, Oklahoma and operates in 25 countries.

The purchase gives Dell an information management and analytics play for its software portfolio. StatSoft's tools will go along with Dell's database management, optimization and integration applications.

StatSoft's flagship software is Statistica Enterprise, which filters and analyzes data from multiple repositories. An enterprise server, data mining suite and modeling tool all fly under the Statistica brand.

statsoft

 

On its site, StatSoft appears to position itself against SAS in many deployments. Statistica combines scientific and technical charts with customization and graphics tools.

statistica1

 

Dell has gone private, but will report its earnings for institutional bondholders on April 1. 

Topics: Enterprise Software, Big Data, Dell

Kick off your day with ZDNet's daily email newsletter. It's the freshest tech news and opinion, served hot. Get it.

Talkback

3 comments
Log in or register to join the discussion
  • RE: Dell acquires StatSoft, adds analytics to software stack

    IBM recently acquired SPSS. And IBM, previously, already had a strong portfolio for BI including data warehousing, OLAP and data/text mining.

    I wonder if Oracle and Microsoft will follow suit to round out their BI offerings ...
    Rabid Howler Monkey
  • companies can buy up all the stats ISVs they want

    but the 2 giants of stats are SAS, which has been around for decades and remains the only practical choice for mainframe stats, and R, which is by most measures the most actively used. Outside of packages focused specifically on econometrics, SAS and R are almost the only stats packages used in academia. Buying Statistica isn't going to help Dell all that much, just as buying SPSS hasn't done much for IBM.
    hrlngrv 
    • Giants

      The reality is that, increasingly, multiple tools are being used by professional data analysts:

      "What Analytics, Big Data, Data mining, Data Science software you used in the past 12 months for a real project?"
      http://www.kdnuggets.com/polls/2013/analytics-big-data-mining-data-science-software.html
      o R, 37.4% (6.5% alone) - Note: usage increasing markedly
      o Rattle, 4.5% (0% alone)
      o Revolution Analytics R Enterprise, 2.8% (1.9% alone)
      o Revolution Analytics R free edition, 2.4% (2.2% alone)
      o SAS, 10.7% (2.0% alone)
      o SAS Enterprise Miner, 5.9% (0% alone)
      o SAS JMP,4.1% (7.8% alone)
      o IBM SPSS Statistics, 8.7% (1.8% alone)
      o IBM SPSS Modeler, 6.1% (6.1% alone)

      Both SAS and IBM SPSS provide a mechanism for R integration and one can reasonably expect with R's increasing popularity that integration will improve, especially for IBM SPSS given IBM's open source leanings. In addition, both SAS and IBM SPSS provide support which is very important in the enterprise. But, not so much in academia.

      Another important factor is ease-of-use. R is predominantly a geeks tool (albeit a very good one!). Meaning that analysts that are not statisticians/mathematicians/machine learning specialists have a steep learning curve if they did not get started with R at uni. Both SAS and IBM SPSS have put considerable effort into effective GUIs for their products.

      AS of today, SAS and IBM SPSS remain the top dogs in commercial data analysis, although Rapid-I, MATLAB and StatSoft are also doing quite well.

      Me? I have R, RapidMiner and Weka on my GNU/Linux desktop systems (in addition to Gnumeric). As well as Mondrian, Gaugin and RServe from rosuda.org.
      Rabid Howler Monkey