Dell, Applied Micro launch ARM proof-of-concept microserver

Dell, Applied Micro launch ARM proof-of-concept microserver

Summary: Dell appears content to continue to showcase the possibilities for ARM servers and wait for broader adoption before a big push.

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Dell on Tuesday said that it has launched a 64-bit ARM proof of concept microserver with Applied Micro and its X-Gene chip.

xgene

Applied Micro is already a partner with HP on its ARM-based Moonshot server effort. Dell has been steadily launching proof-of-concept microservers for showcase at its Solution Centers, but hasn't gone production with ARM microservers.

For now, Dell appears content to continue to showcase the possibilities for ARM servers and wait for broader adoption before a big push.

In a blog post, Dell said that it is testing ARM servers with select customers. Dell announced a bevy of partnerships at the Open Compute Summit next week.

Dell is also showcasing microservers based on Intel's Atom processor.

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Topics: Servers, Data Centers, Dell

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  • Intel

    The 14 nanometer Intel chips are going to blow the Current generation of ARM chips out of the water in energy use and computing power. Most major server farms see it coming and have decided to wait.
    hayneiii@...
    • When ARM runs on 14 nanometer hardware...

      it would blow Intel architecture out of the water in energy use and computing power.

      The inherent advantage of using a chip with a 1 to 3 clock cycle per instruction over several hundred clocks per instruction will not be stopped.

      Now Intel COULD blow ARM out, but only if they drop the use of the x86 instructions.
      jessepollard
  • A couple decades ago .....

    Digital Equipment (DEC) a mini-mainframe computer company released an one of the first ARM designs, the StrongARM processor, that went on to be produced by Intel. RISC processors were not the norm and it never really caught on.
    GaryDMN