Denied: Apple's request to see Samsung customer log

Denied: Apple's request to see Samsung customer log

Summary: Currently in litigation for its patent lawsuit, Cupertino had asked to see Samsung's call center records in bid to find evidence of customer confusion over similarity of both companies' products.

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Samsung has denied Apple's request to see its call center log, saying the scope is too broad because it includes numerous calls of customers complaining about the latter's products, and will be difficult and time-consuming to fulfill.

Both companies are currently in the pre-trial phase of their lawsuit over allegations that each had violated patents associated with the other's smartphones and tablets. In the "discovery" process of the pre-trial period, each party can submit request to the other party for documents and other information which they think will be useful in their argument.

According to Apple news site Edible Apple, Cupertino had asked to see Samsung's call center log and that the South Korean company produce "any instances of customer confusion", which it had known about, that demonstrated examples of customers who confused a Samsung product for an Apple device.

In a statement earlier this year that Samsung violated its patents, Apple had pointed to the similarities between both companies' products. A Cupertino spokesperson said: "It's no coincidence that Samsung's latest products look a lot like the iPhone and iPad, from the shape of the hardware to the user interface and even the packaging. This kind of blatant copying is wrong, and we need to protect Apple's intellectual property when companies steal our ideas."

Evidence that customers had confused products from either company might help its argument.

Samsung, however, turned down the request, arguing that the scope of the request was too broad and would include numerous calls in which its customers had criticized Apple's products.

Edible Apple cited the Korean company's reply: "For example, it is possible that Samsung customers may have contacted the call centers to comment on how they disliked their previous Apple product, but enjoyed using their Samsung product. This would not be responsive to Apple's requests because the consumer is not expressing any confusion as to the source of the product he or she was calling about."

Topics: Hardware, Legal, Mobility, Software Development, IT Employment

About

Eileen Yu began covering the IT industry when Asynchronous Transfer Mode was still hip and e-commerce was the new buzzword. Currently based in Singapore, she has over 16 years of industry experience with various publications including ZDNet, IDG, and Singapore Press Holdings.

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