Dopod mini notebook is tempting

Dopod mini notebook is tempting

Summary: I still take notes using my trusty pen and paper when I'm out attending a press conference or conducting an interview. Lugging around my ThinkPad X31--even though it's an ultraportable notebook--presents too much of a hassle.

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TOPICS: Hardware
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I still take notes using my trusty pen and paper when I'm out attending a press conference or conducting an interview. Lugging around my ThinkPad X31--even though it's an ultraportable notebook--presents too much of a hassle. I've looked at PDAs, but for some reason, I've not been compelled to buy one.

Based on what I need for note-taking during a one-hour interview or keynote speech, Dopod's U1000 mini notebook with 3.5G connectivity may just be the device I've been holding out for. Its 5-inch VGA LCD screen is big enough for an easy read, but I confess, what caught my eye is its clean-cut design and cool metallic silver color (no female stereotypical colors like hot pink, for me, thank you). The other cool factor is the magnetic QWERTY keyboard, which serves as a detachable cover to protect the screen. No hinges to worry about; the magnet is strong enough to keep it firmly in place but lets you pull it apart easily, too.

You can use the U1000 as a mobile phone, take photos using the built-in 3-megapixel camera, browse Web pages, or even watch movies. If you want to give a business presentation, there is a VGA/TV out function which lets you easily connect to a TV or projector. Dopod has also included the Opera Mobile browser, as well as the VueFlo browser which makes use of motion sensor technology to make Web browsing easier.

Okay, I'm no gizmo freak, as my colleagues know, but I am actually entertaining the thought of buying one...or not.

Think I'll sleep on it, and let the practical side of me decide if the U1000 should stay on my wishlist for 2007.

The U1000 will hit Singapore stores at the end of February. Suggested retail price: S$1,998 (US$1,303).

Topic: Hardware

About

Eileen Yu began covering the IT industry when Asynchronous Transfer Mode was still hip and e-commerce was the new buzzword. Currently a freelance blogger and content specialist based in Singapore, she has over 16 years of industry experience with various publications including ZDNet, IDG, and Singapore Press Holdings.

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6 comments
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  • wow! you've been THAT faithful to your thinkpad! a rarity in today's world. :-)
    anonymous
  • Yeah... Old as it is, the X31 is great to use. It's slim and light--just right for me! But of course I won't complain if the company gives me a new laptop. Hmm, I could suggest the U1000 to them...
    anonymous
  • would that be a rarity? i still use my X22 although i have an Acer 5540...
    anonymous
  • As a gadget freak, and one who used to review them for a living, I have always craved devices that allow me to do my job better. Taking notes quickly is one of the key criteria. I used to buy PDA after PDA, but since I started using a Treo, nothing will ever do...save for PDAs with VGA screens, which are excellent for reading ebooks (crisp fonts, see?).

    But just because a device can do all that magic doesn't make it usable until one can work on it in almost any situation (in the MRT, standing in line, etc) and without no slowdown. Some of these Windows Mobile (WM) devices have Swiss Army-do everything and anything qualities but are actually rather frustrating, because of their slow speeds. Do try one out at the store first, and not be wowed by the specs list.

    For me, nothing beats the Treo 750. Yet.
    anonymous
  • Good point about testing it first. I decided against making a hasty decision, and slept on it. The wow factor died down 48 hours later, and... I decided to splurge S$800 on a set of golf clubs instead. Figured that golf lessons would be a better investment for now.
    anonymous
  • For tech geeks who need that drool factor, there's also another piece of technology worth considering: the Moleskine. Sure, Moleskines are just overpriced paper notebooks, but the classic (and classy) black cover, and back pocket for storing whatever, and excellent quality makes it worthwhile $40 piece of "manual PDA". Check out http://www.moleskinerie.com/ for more on the cult of the Moleskine. Geeks will eat it up. Non-geeks too. Oh, and do the math. A smartphone/mini notebook thingy costs an average of $1,300-$1,500. You could buy about 40 of the little Moleskines to last half a lifetime.
    anonymous