E-waste: spring clean your tech junk

E-waste: spring clean your tech junk

Summary: Aussies recycle several million tonnes of computers, TVs, mobile phones and other e-waste every year, with the number set to skyrocket over the next decade. ZDNet Australia takes an extended look into what happens to your devices when you're done with them.

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Aussies recycle several million tonnes of computers, TVs, mobile phones and other e-waste every year, with the number set to skyrocket over the next decade. ZDNet Australia takes an extended look into what happens to your devices when you're done with them.

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Topics: Laptops, Emerging Tech, Hardware, Mobility, Servers

Luke Hopewell

About Luke Hopewell

A fresh recruit onto the tech journalism battlefield, Luke Hopewell is eager to see some action. After a tour of duty in the belly of the Telstra beast, he is keen to report big stories on the enterprise beat. Drawing on past experience in radio, print and magazine, he plans to ask all the tough questions you want answered.

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5 comments
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  • Check out the ByteBack program initiated by the AIIA in Victoria: http://www.bytebackaustralia.com.au/about

    Most of the major computing systems suppliers (including Apple, Canon, Dell, Epson, Fujitsu, Fuji-Xerox, HP, IBM, Lenovo, and Lexmark) have signed up to recycle their goods for FREE for individuals and small businesses.

    It WAS also going to be rolled out in Western Australia: Industry had agreed to cover the costs, all the paperwork was ready to go following the Victorian model, and all it needed was the green light from state government. Unfortunately it was blocked by state government for some unexplained "reason"...

    Perhaps a (the?) big electronic waste recycling company lobbied government to cancel it because it would hurt their business...? Such a pity!
    krugerm-ec953
  • "They've produced and sold the product, so realistically it should be their responsibility to dispose of it properly."

    Similar to how the manufacturers of plastic bags, food, board games, etc etc are responsible for their reclamation?
    blargh-c84aa
  • In my last upgrade, i droped the case into the recycle bin (Full metal), and then sold the old parts online.

    My local concil supports e-waste, but the collection depots are at hard to reach places.
    amckern-b0f83
  • Great article, I quite like it as I am an IT Technician at a school and highly encourage e-cycling to all our staff and students. It would be great if some of this information could be made into some posters for display? Am going to do the environmentally friendly thing at the moment anyway and link to the article from our Intranet.
    samwize-aeec2
  • I think one of the major issues with e-waste prevention is the fact that, like amckern mentioned, accessibility is a real problem in Australia. Someone on www.ewaste.co mentioned the other day that there's a real shortage of places around for people to actually recycle their e-waste. Sure, education is one part, but the other really needs to be access to facilities, else what's really the point?
    pinpal101