Eight out of 10 businesses believe Macs are more reliable than Windows machines, claims new survey

Eight out of 10 businesses believe Macs are more reliable than Windows machines, claims new survey

Summary: The survey of more than 200 IT decision makers also found that 95 percent of the businesses that don’t currently provide Macs would be more likely to offer employees Macs if they had a single central management system for both Windows PCs and Macs.

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TOPICS: Hardware, Apple
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A new survey carried out by Parallels – the company behind tools such as Parallels Desktop for Mac – suggests that businesses are warming up to Apple's OS X platform, and that many are willing to consider broader corporate adoption.

The survey, which polled more than 200 IT decision makers about their attitudes toward Macs in the enterprise, found that 45 percent of businesses currently offer their employees Macs, and that 95 percent of the businesses that don’t currently provide Macs would be more likely to offer them if they had a single central management system for both Windows PCs and Macs.

The results of the survey throw up some interesting data points that IT pros – especially those adhered to Windows only – should take note of:

  • 77 percent of IT pros said that Macs are more reliable overall than Windows machines.
  • 65 percent said that Macs are easier to support.
  • 65 percent said that offering Macs would likely help attract employees (a very important factor given the competition for talent).

The survey also shed light on some of the roadblocks to Mac adoption:

  • 70 percent cited the main reason they don’t allow Macs onto their network is because they lack the expertise to manage them.
  • 68 percent said Macs aren't allowed because they are unable to run Windows apps.
  • 53 percent cited the lack of proper management tools.

"This survey reinforces what we already knew: Macs are coming into the enterprise but often are supported only reluctantly and not managed efficiently," said Parallels President Jack Zubarev. "With Parallels Desktop for Mac Enterprise Edition and our Mac management plug-in for Microsoft SCCM, Parallels removes two of the biggest roadblocks to Macs in the enterprise: The ability to run Windows applications on the Mac and giving IT departments a single pane of glass to manage Macs and PCs."

The new Mac management plug-in by Parallels even comes with a seal of approval from Microsoft.

"Microsoft is committed to enabling IT organizations to manage heterogeneous environments, including those that have both PCs and Macs," said Andrew Conway, Senior Director, Product Marketing, Microsoft. "System Center Configuration Manager is designed for extensibility, and the Parallels Mac Management plug-in was built to help expand and enhance System Center’s management of Macs in enterprise environments. A single team with one set of tools can use the Parallels plug-in and help decrease redundancies and reduce OPEX costs."

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Topics: Hardware, Apple

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168 comments
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  • Funny

    Just one thing to add: ignorance is bliss.
    TheCyberKnight
    • I do like that question

      "65 percent said that offering Macs would likely help attract employees (a very important factor given the competition for talent)"

      Imagine passing up a great job because the company don't use Macs. It's like a working passing up a great machine operator job because they don't use Caterpillar.
      William.Farrel
      • I can see it happening

        Designers particularly, like working on nice beautiful iMacs.

        If you're a top flight designer, and you want a computer whose aesthetics live up to your standards for working with beautiful things, and you have your pick of employer.... who wouldn't make an employment choice based on what you had to stare at ten hours a day?
        Mac_PC_FenceSitter
        • "You have your pick of employer"

          From what I hear and read in the news any more, many people would be lucky to have a chance at job, let alone pick and choose based on how beautiful you think the simple hardware is.

          Maybe for the sought after people who have built a reputation or being wanted, but then again, would what you're using computer wise a few hours a day really be something of importance to you? You would think they would be above such petty needs?
          William.Farrel
          • Oh So Silly

            William.Farrell attempts to think like the person he isn't and concludes, um, they would likely act like him.

            Eye roll.

            I wouldn't not work at a place because it was adamantly Windows only. Beyond that, who cares, and if it reduces the applicants for a position I was seeking, hooray.

            But, that being said, a place that has mixed hardware, operating systems, and applications understands how to be productive: they figured out the many ways to skin the cat and the let the employee use the method with which they excel. Their IT staff may have to work harder, but then, it's about production, not how relaxed the IT staff is.
            DannyO_0x98
          • Right. Which is why you sit on a wooden crate in front of a piece

            of plywood. Because, after all, why would what you sit on and use for a desk a few hours a day really be of importance to you?
            baggins_z
          • He's talking about Form versus Function.

            When working with a computer, you should be paying attention what is shown on the display, not what the bezel looks like.

            OS X and Windows are already similar in productivity.

            How your computer looks should not be a matter in which job you use.


            You could have compared "a slow Dell and a new Mac", but bringing up an element that would make both systems unusable to average people just kills your argument.

            The average piece of plywood and a crate has little to no ergonomic value for using a computer.

            You may enjoy using a Mac with the aforementioned set of "furniture", but the rest of us will enjoy our desks with our machines, whether it runs Windows or OS X.
            ForeverCookie
          • Re: He's talking about Form versus Function....

            Based on that theory then you would be quite happy driving an old banger than a new car as you would be only looking through the windscreen regardless of the fact the newer car is likely to be the more reliable.
            5735guy
          • You're completely disregarding the fact that...

            ... there are MANY good and new Windows PCs out there.

            It's like a matter of a Ferrari versus a Porsche.

            Both are expensive, and both are decent cars.

            Your comparison is incredibly biased towards Apple, in this case.
            ForeverCookie
          • Re: there are MANY good and new Windows PCs out there....

            Absolutely and of that I have no doubt.

            There are MANY good old Macs out there as well.

            Hence my claim of Mac Hardware longevity.
            5735guy
        • Beautiful?

          Unless you are a design or marketing company I doubt how "beautiful" a PC is makes the top 5 when purchasing a new fleet for the next 2-3 years.

          Are Apple users are so vain?
          MobileAdmin
        • I can see it happening too.

          Mac fanbois are definitely not playing with a full deck.
          ye
          • The one who isn't playing with a full deck is a

            manager who pays $80k a year for a top notch designer than pitches a fit at spending what is essentially two days of his salary on the computer hardware that will make him a happy employee.
            baggins_z
          • Nothing of what you said changes what I wrote.

            nt
            ye
          • Shrug

            Nor does saying that take anything away from his point that it is, in fact, a relatively minor concession.
            Mac_PC_FenceSitter
          • You're right...it does not.

            "Nor does saying that take anything away from his point that it is, in fact, a relatively minor concession."

            And wasn't intended to.
            ye
          • lol

            So $80k is what a "top notch designer" makes? I'm glad I chose a field that doesn't have a prerequisite of being a pretentious snob and being broke.
            You really should avoid management because you clearly have no idea what makes employees happy.
            blarelli
          • He may be more onto it than you would like to admit

            When we hire designers, they usually want Macs, and we usually oblige. They know the platform better, they know the keyboard bindings and tricks of the trade by heart, and we're willing to make them comfortable so that they're productive right away, rather than making emotionally driven decisions to please partisan PC fanbois on the Internet, who have no dog in our hunt anyways.
            Mac_PC_FenceSitter
          • You think their decision to use a Mac is based on anything more than...

            "When we hire designers, they usually want Macs, and we usually oblige."

            ...emotion? I see this on a daily basis...co-workers using Macs under the though "They just work". All the while waiting on them to start their Windows VM so they can participate in a web conference. Or struggling with calendar syncing issues. Etc, etc.
            ye
          • A web conference like, oh, let's say WebEx?

            They do Mac. Maybe you meant GoToMeeting? Oh, right. They do Mac too. Silly me... you must have meant Microsoft Lync, which is Windows onl.... oh, right it isn't, they're on Mac too.
            Mac_PC_FenceSitter