Finding a middle ground

Finding a middle ground

Summary: weekly roundup An analyst was spot on last week when he pointed out that enterprises will mix-and-match open-source and proprietary software in their IT infrastructure.Most enterprises are not zealots of technology, and software is just a means to an end--that is, to run their business well.

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TOPICS: Open Source
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weekly roundup An analyst was spot on last week when he pointed out that enterprises will mix-and-match open-source and proprietary software in their IT infrastructure.

Most enterprises are not zealots of technology, and software is just a means to an end--that is, to run their business well. Most wouldn't care less about the heated debates between proponents of proprietary and open-source software. Companies just want to get things done, and will opt for anything that fulfills that goal at an affordable price.

What I put on my machine at home is similar to how enterprises choose to deploy software.

I don't use Linux just because it's more secure. In fact, I have to patch loopholes in my system every now and then, albeit on a less regular basis compared to my Windows-based laptop at work.

I run Linux because it gives me control over the look and feel of my desktop. I don’t have to reboot each time I install a new application, and I haven't been hit by a virus to date.

I use virtualization software to run the Windows programs I can't do without, such as Adobe Acrobat and my Pinnacle PC TV software, which don't work well on Linux even with the available workarounds. My three-year-old USB scanner refuses to interoperate with Linux, so I've connected that to my Windows XP virtual machine.

In a nutshell, just like the enterprises that Gartner described, I operate a mixed environment--running Windows apps with Linux as my core computing platform--because it helps me get things done in a secure and efficient manner. And it's not simply about having to choose one camp, over the other.

In other headlines this week, find out how poor Wi-Fi drivers can expose laptops, and whether Intel's new Xeon 5100 will dent rival AMD's Opteron market share.

Also, read about Asia's rising public sector IT spending and how companies ensure they comply with licensing laws.

Topic: Open Source

About

Eileen Yu began covering the IT industry when Asynchronous Transfer Mode was still hip and e-commerce was the new buzzword. Currently based in Singapore, she has over 16 years of industry experience with various publications including ZDNet, IDG, and Singapore Press Holdings.

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